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From the College of Natural Sciences
Computer Science Online Master’s Degree Planned for Fall Launch from UT Austin

Computer Science Online Master’s Degree Planned for Fall Launch from UT Austin

The Department of Computer Science plans to launch an online master's degree program in fall 2019.

The University of Texas at Austin is making plans to bring its top-ranked computer science graduate program to students and professionals beyond campus through a new online master's degree program. Pending final approval by UT System and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, the university will partner with online learning provider edX to make UT's Top 10 computer science master's degree available to students around the world, affordably and on their own schedule.

MacArthur Foundation Fellows Include UT Austin’s Inventor of ‘Cancer Pen’

MacArthur Foundation Fellows Include UT Austin’s Inventor of ‘Cancer Pen’

Livia S. Eberlin, chemistry professor at the University of Texas at Austin has won a MacArthur "genius award." Photo credit: Wyatt McSpadden/Univ. of Texas at Austin.

Livia Schiavinato Eberlin, an assistant professor of chemistry at The University of Texas at Austin, has won a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, sometimes called a "genius" award. The prestigious, no-strings-attached five-year fellowship awards $625,000 to each recipient.

StarDate Radio Program Celebrates 40 Years

StarDate Radio Program Celebrates 40 Years

Award winning radio program StarDate turns 40 years old

The longest running nationally aired science program is marking a major milestone. "StarDate" radio, produced by The University of Texas at Austin's McDonald Observatory, celebrates 40 years on the nation's airwaves. In its nearly 15,000 daily two-minute episodes, "StarDate" has brought skywatching and astronomy to millions of listeners across the United States. Today, it airs on about 400 radio affiliates, split evenly between public and commercial stations.

Four to Receive Major Awards from Chemical Societies

Four to Receive Major Awards from Chemical Societies

Four chemists (from left to right): Eric Anslyn, Jennifer Brodbelt, Hung-Wen (Ben) Liu, Jonathan Sessler receive major awards. Image Credit: University of Texas at Austin

Four UT Austin faculty members have won major awards for 2019 from the American Chemical Society (ACS) and the International Conference on Calixarenes for their contributions to an array of research areas.

Computer Scientists Receive $1.7 Million Grant to Make Chip Design Easier

Computer Scientists Receive $1.7 Million Grant to Make Chip Design Easier

Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin, Yale University and Texas State University have been awarded $5 million by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) as part of a program designed to spark the next wave of semiconductor innovation and circuit design in the U.S.

UT Austin Alum James Allison Awarded Nobel Prize

UT Austin Alum James Allison Awarded Nobel Prize

James P. Allison, a world-renowned pioneer of cancer immunotherapy, has been awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine jointly with Tasuku Honjo "for their discovery of cancer therapy by inhibition of negative immune regulation."

Extending a Welcome Mat for Scientific, Mathematical Talent

Extending a Welcome Mat for Scientific, Mathematical Talent

In recent weeks, a pair of researchers received two of the biggest prizes in science, the Breakthrough Prize and the Lasker Award. Both women seized the moment to shine a light on something too frequently cast into the shadows—namely that STEM fields need more women and people from underrepresented communities involved and made welcome in their pursuits.

Math Graduate Students Place Top 10 in International Student Paper Competition

Math Graduate Students Place Top 10 in International Student Paper Competition

From left to right: Ioakeim Ampatzoglou, Nataša Pavlović, Matthew Rosenzweig

At a conference of the American Institute of Mathematical Sciences (AIMS) in Taipei, Taiwan in July, Matthew Rosenzweig was awarded second place and Ioakeim Ampatzoglou received an honorable mention in the Student Paper Competition, which named ten finalists. Both are graduate students of UT Austin mathematics professor Nataša Pavlović.

Scientists Discover Why Some Bacteria Turn Bad

Scientists Discover Why Some Bacteria Turn Bad

Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) bacteria approach intestinal epithelial cells during human infection. When in close proximity to the host epithelium ETEC senses oxygen seeping (blue) from intestinal epithelial cells to increase expression of adhesins and secreted toxins (magenta). Image Credit: Brad Gilleland

Every year, millions of people have vacations and business trips ruined when they succumb to "traveler's diarrhea" during their journeys. A major cause of traveler's diarrhea is bacteria called Enterotoxigenic E. coli, or ETEC. A joint effort between scientists at the University of Georgia and the University of Texas at Austin has discovered what triggers ETEC to produce dangerous toxins in the body. They are using this information in an effort to develop a preventive vaccine for travelers.

Resilient Marine Scientists Home Again as Lab Building Reopens after Harvey

Resilient Marine Scientists Home Again as Lab Building Reopens after Harvey

Being a marine scientist entails coping with extremes, from scuba diving deep in the ocean to interacting with living organisms that are among the planet's most mysterious creatures. Nonetheless, Hurricane Harvey was a whole new extreme for The University of Texas's Marine Science Institute.