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From the College of Natural Sciences
A New Way to Disarm Antibiotic Resistance in Deadly Bacteria

A New Way to Disarm Antibiotic Resistance in Deadly Bacteria

An antibiotic resistant bacterium (Klebsiella pneumoniae) is treated solely with the last-resort antibiotic imipenem (left); and with a combination of imipenem and a DsbA inhibitor, causing it to rupture and die (right). Image credit: Nikol Kadeřábková.

Scientists think they may have uncovered a whole new approach to fighting antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which, if successful, would help address a health crisis responsible for more deaths every year than either AIDS or malaria.

Remembering Steven Weinberg (Audio)

Remembering Steven Weinberg (Audio)

Today, in the first of two parts of a special segment, we're remembering the life and legacy of one of the greatest theoretical physicists of all time — The University of Texas at Austin's Steven Weinberg, who died in July. We're exploring who he was as a scientist, writer and mentor — and a deep thinker about our place in the universe. We'll hear from colleagues who worked with him — fellow UT Austin physicists Katherine Freese, Willy Fischler and Can Kilic — and from his former student John Preskill.

Astronomer Brendan Bowler Receives 2022 Sloan Research Fellowship

Astronomer Brendan Bowler Receives 2022 Sloan Research Fellowship

Brendan Bowler, an assistant professor of astronomy from the University of Texas at Austin's College of Natural Sciences has been selected as a 2022 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Physics.

Unraveling How One of the Most Important Cell Types Form

Unraveling How One of the Most Important Cell Types Form

Scientists studying plants have uncovered a key part of the process that forms one of the most important cell types on Earth.

Evolutionary Roots and that Loving Feeling

Evolutionary Roots and that Loving Feeling

In honor of Valentine's Day, we're taking a look at some evolutionary lessons about love and attraction from College of Natural Science researchers in the Department of Integrative Biology.

Two Faculty Named Association for Psychological Science Rising Stars

Two Faculty Named Association for Psychological Science Rising Stars

Two faculty members in the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, Liz Muñoz and Hannah Williamson, received Rising Star recognition.

Two early-career faculty members in the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences have been named Rising Stars by the Association for Psychological Science, one of the top honors in the field.

Weight Gain in Pregnancy May Be Linked to Later Growth Patterns in Daughters

Weight Gain in Pregnancy May Be Linked to Later Growth Patterns in Daughters

Rapid weight gain in the first and final months of a pregnancy may play a key role in the development of excess fat tissue in children and adolescents – at least if those children are girls, according to a new study from researchers at The University of Texas at Austin.

Zak Page Named a 2022 Cottrell Scholar

Zak Page Named a 2022 Cottrell Scholar

​Zachariah Page, assistant professor of chemistry at The University of Texas at Austin, has been selected as a 2022 Cottrell Scholar by the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

Dan Leahy Selected as Fellow of American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Dan Leahy Selected as Fellow of American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

​The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology today announced that Daniel Leahy has been named among its newest class of fellows. Designation as a fellow recognizes outstanding accomplishments in research, education, mentorship and service. Leahy is the first UT Austin faculty member to be named a fellow and a member of the second-ever fellows class. 

Bill Wren, Tireless Promoter of Dark Skies, Retires from McDonald Observatory

Bill Wren, Tireless Promoter of Dark Skies, Retires from McDonald Observatory

After more than three decades of sharing astronomy with the public and working to protect dark skies from light pollution, Bill Wren has retired from McDonald Observatory.