News

From the College of Natural Sciences
Two Rare Orchids Discovered at Brackenridge Field Lab

Two Rare Orchids Discovered at Brackenridge Field Lab

Last week Robert Deans, a University of Texas at Austin graduate student in ecology, evolution and behavior, discovered an extremely rare orchid in an unexpected place—at an urban biological field station in the heart of Austin, Texas.

Neuroscientist Receives 2016 Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Award

Neuroscientist Receives 2016 Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Award

Michael Drew, an assistant professor of neuroscience, was one of 11 University of Texas at Austin faculty members chosen to receive prestigious 2016 Regents' Outstanding Teaching Awards from The University of Texas System Board of Regents.

UT Computer Scientist Named Simons Foundation Investigator

UT Computer Scientist Named Simons Foundation Investigator

Computer scientist David Zuckerman of The University of Texas at Austin has been selected as a 2016 Simons Investigator in Theoretical Computer Science by the Simons Foundation for his work in pseudorandomness and randomness extraction.

Young 'Super-Neptune' Offers Clues to Origin of Close-in Exoplanets

Young 'Super-Neptune' Offers Clues to Origin of Close-in Exoplanets

A team of astronomers led by Andrew Mann of The University of Texas at Austin has confirmed the existence of a young planet, only 11 million years old, that orbits extremely close to its star (at 0.05 AU), with an orbital period of 5.4 days. Approximately five times the size of Earth, the new planet is a "super-Neptune" and the youngest such planet known. The discovery lends unique insights into the origin of planetary system architectures.

Rare, Blind Catfish Never Before Found in U.S. Discovered in Texas

Rare, Blind Catfish Never Before Found in U.S. Discovered in Texas

An extremely rare eyeless catfish species previously known to exist only in Mexico has been discovered in a National Recreation Area in Texas.

Supporting Pollinators Could Have Big Payoff for Texas Cotton Farmers

Supporting Pollinators Could Have Big Payoff for Texas Cotton Farmers

According to a new study by The University of Texas at Austin, increasing the diversity of pollinator species, including bees, flies and butterflies, can dramatically increase cotton production. The researchers estimate that in South Texas, the region they studied, increasing the diversity of pollinators could boost cotton production by up to 18 percent, yielding an increase in annual revenue of more than $1.1 million.

​Physicists Earn Career Research Awards from the Humboldt Foundation

​Physicists Earn Career Research Awards from the Humboldt Foundation

UT Austin physics professors Mike Downer and Philip J. Morrison each have garnered career research awards from the Humboldt Foundation to fund international research collaborations with German physicists.

CNS Student Cyclists Kick-Off Charity Ride to Alaska

CNS Student Cyclists Kick-Off Charity Ride to Alaska

CNS student cyclists participating in the Texas 4000 charity bike ride to Alaska pose for a photo Friday at a kick-off event on campus.

Eighteen student cyclists from the College of Natural Sciences will begin a 4,000-mile bike ride from Austin to Anchorage, Alaska this weekend as part of Texas 4000, the longest annual charity bike ride in the world.

Why is CGI in the Movies Still So Hard? (Audio)

Why is CGI in the Movies Still So Hard? (Audio)

As the summer movie season kicks into high gear, we talk with a scientist about some of the challenges in simulating the way everyday objects behave on the big screen through computer generated imagery (CGI). Etienne Vouga's computer simulations have helped bring to life a wizard's hair in The Hobbit and clothing in Tangled.

Hands-On Science Courses Boost Graduation Rates and STEM Retention

Hands-On Science Courses Boost Graduation Rates and STEM Retention

In a positive sign for efforts to boost U.S. competitiveness in science and technology, a new study finds that courses that engage college students in conducting scientific research early on can dramatically increase students' odds of completing a science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) degree.