Featured New Cystic Fibrosis Research Examines Deadly Pathogen
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A new method of testing the most common cause of life-threatening infection in people with cystic fibrosis could improve efforts to study and combat the illness.

Featured Fun with Chemistry Inspires Students of All Ages
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A woman in a lab coat, protective goggles, and gloves stands at the front of a packed school auditorium and yells, “Do you like science?” The room full of children screams back, “YES!” The woman dumps a vat of hot water into a bucket of liquid nitrogen; instantly, a cloud of nitrogen gas fills the front of the room as children applaud and cheer. Thus ends another demonstration of Fun with Chemistry.

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Pi Day, celebrated every year on March 14, corresponds with the first three digits of pi (3.14 also happens to be Albert Einstein’s birthday). Pi pops up anytime you want to mathematically describe a circle, curve or sphere, but a Pi Day like this year’s is special. That’s because throwing in the year gives you five digits of pi (3.1415)—something that only happens once a century.

Featured 6 Things You Never Knew about Welch Hall
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Since its completion in 1931, Welch Hall has hosted chemists and many other members of the College of Natural Sciences family. With the Texas Legislature currently weighing a bill to help renovate Welch, we look at some history and fun facts about a place on campus that nearly every Longhorn knows well.

Featured Amphibians Join the Genomic Revolution
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The dramatic drop in cost and time needed to sequence the genomes of animals over the past decade has revolutionized the study of evolutionary relationships. But for scientists who study amphibians, it feels like the genomics revolution has passed them by. More than 100 complete vertebrate genomes have been sequenced and released—including about 40 mammals, 13 fish, 9 birds and 9 reptiles. But amphibians? Just one.

Featured Two Assistant Professors Win CAREER Awards from National Science Foundation
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Two assistant professors in the College of Natural Sciences have received Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) awards from the National Science Foundation totaling more than half a million dollars.

Featured New Protein Booster May Lead to Better DNA Vaccines and Gene Therapy
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Scientists have discovered a new way to manipulate how cells function, a finding that might help advance an experimental approach to improving public health: DNA vaccines, which could be more efficient, less expensive and easier to store than traditional vaccines.

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Discovered nearly a century ago, the Diels-Alder reaction has been used by synthetic chemists in many industries to produce everything from morphine to plastics. It turns out nature, too, may be performing Diels-Alder-like reactions, researchers have found. 

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A faculty member at the University of Texas at Austin who works to improve the security and reliability of computer software systems has been awarded a Sloan Research Fellowship for 2015.

Featured Undergraduate Takes Mathematical Approach in 3D Filmmaking
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In 2015, the Freshman Research Initiative (FRI) celebrates its 10th anniversary. In honor of that milestone, we are checking in with some of the alumni of the FRI program who use what they learn in interesting ways. Olivia Biehle, an undergraduate double-majoring in Mathematics and Radio-TV-Film, combines her two very different passions through 3D filmmaking. She also used movie-making skills in her involvement with the Cosmic Dawn FRI research stream, as she explains in an interview.