News

From the College of Natural Sciences
Betelgeuse May Have Swallowed Companion 100,000 Years Ago

Betelgeuse May Have Swallowed Companion 100,000 Years Ago

Astronomer J. Craig Wheeler of The University of Texas at Austin thinks that Betelgeuse, the bright red star marking the shoulder of Orion, the hunter, may have had a past that is more interesting than meets the eye. Working with an international group of undergraduate students, Wheeler has found evidence that the red supergiant star may have been born with a companion star, and later swallowed that star. The research is published today in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

The Mighty Copepod (Audio)

The Mighty Copepod (Audio)

These teeny shrimp-like critters at the bottom of the ocean food web seem totally unimportant. But throw in an oil spill and some well-intentioned human intervention and they can have a huge impact, right up to the top of the food web, including sea turtles, dolphins and humans. Meet the mighty copepod.

12 UT Austin-Linked Developments in the Fight Against Cancer

12 UT Austin-Linked Developments in the Fight Against Cancer

Earlier this year, the nation launched what's been called the Cancer Moonshot initiative—a monumental new effort to boost cancer research in pursuit of a cure. In the months leading up to this new initiative—and in the months since—faculty scientists, alumni and students brought many causes for hope to the fight against cancer.

Thinking Differently: Physics Student Promotes Neurodiversity at UT Austin

Thinking Differently: Physics Student Promotes Neurodiversity at UT Austin

Undergraduate Manuel Díaz advocates for neurodiversity – widening acceptance of neurological differences, ranging from autism to dyslexia to Tourette's syndrome.

Charles Fraser Mends Little Hearts

Charles Fraser Mends Little Hearts

Charles Fraser is Surgeon-in-Chief at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston. He received a bachelor's degree in mathematics from UT Austin in 1980.

Enzyme Safely Starves Cancer Cells in Preclinical Study

Enzyme Safely Starves Cancer Cells in Preclinical Study

A research team led by scientists at The University of Texas Austin has engineered an enzyme that safely treats prostate and breast cancer in animals and also lengthens the lifespan of models that develop chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The new treatment and results from preclinical trials are described in a paper published in the Nov. 21 issue of Nature Medicine.

DNA Repair Findings Shed Light on Pathways Affecting Cancer Progression

DNA Repair Findings Shed Light on Pathways Affecting Cancer Progression

For healthy cells to become cancerous cells, they have to lose several systems that regulate healthy function such as cell growth and division and DNA repair. New findings from University of Texas at Austin researchers about how one such regulatory system works could aid in efforts to develop personalized treatments for cancer.

College Publication Wins UT System Award

College Publication Wins UT System Award

The College of Natural Sciences' magazine, The Texas Scientist, was chosen to receive the 2016 University of Texas System Chancellor's Excellence Award for Outstanding Publications. The award "recognizes outstanding work in the production of both print and online publications…that advance the university's mission with excellence in writing, design and creativity."

Daniel Bolnick to Receive O'Donnell Award from TAMEST

Daniel Bolnick to Receive O'Donnell Award from TAMEST

An evolutionary biologist is one of two faculty members from The University of Texas at Austin who will receive Edith and Peter O'Donnell Awards from The Academy of Medicine, Engineering & Science of Texas (TAMEST) at its annual conference on Jan. 11.

Insights from a Software Architect at Fall Commencement

Insights from a Software Architect at Fall Commencement

Students graduating this December will hear from an accomplished and world-changing software architect who walked across a similar UT stage—twice.