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From the College of Natural Sciences
Computer Scientists Receive $1.7 Million Grant to Make Chip Design Easier

Computer Scientists Receive $1.7 Million Grant to Make Chip Design Easier

Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin, Yale University and Texas State University have been awarded $5 million by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) as part of a program designed to spark the next wave of semiconductor innovation and circuit design in the U.S.

UT Austin Alum James Allison Awarded Nobel Prize

UT Austin Alum James Allison Awarded Nobel Prize

James P. Allison, a world-renowned pioneer of cancer immunotherapy, has been awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine jointly with Tasuku Honjo "for their discovery of cancer therapy by inhibition of negative immune regulation."

Extending a Welcome Mat for Scientific, Mathematical Talent

Extending a Welcome Mat for Scientific, Mathematical Talent

In recent weeks, a pair of researchers received two of the biggest prizes in science, the Breakthrough Prize and the Lasker Award. Both women seized the moment to shine a light on something too frequently cast into the shadows—namely that STEM fields need more women and people from underrepresented communities involved and made welcome in their pursuits.

Math Graduate Students Place Top 10 in International Student Paper Competition

Math Graduate Students Place Top 10 in International Student Paper Competition

From left to right: Ioakeim Ampatzoglou, Nataša Pavlović, Matthew Rosenzweig

At a conference of the American Institute of Mathematical Sciences (AIMS) in Taipei, Taiwan in July, Matthew Rosenzweig was awarded second place and Ioakeim Ampatzoglou received an honorable mention in the Student Paper Competition, which named ten finalists. Both are graduate students of UT Austin mathematics professor Nataša Pavlović.

Scientists Discover Why Some Bacteria Turn Bad

Scientists Discover Why Some Bacteria Turn Bad

Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) bacteria approach intestinal epithelial cells during human infection. When in close proximity to the host epithelium ETEC senses oxygen seeping (blue) from intestinal epithelial cells to increase expression of adhesins and secreted toxins (magenta). Image Credit: Brad Gilleland

Every year, millions of people have vacations and business trips ruined when they succumb to "traveler's diarrhea" during their journeys. A major cause of traveler's diarrhea is bacteria called Enterotoxigenic E. coli, or ETEC. A joint effort between scientists at the University of Georgia and the University of Texas at Austin has discovered what triggers ETEC to produce dangerous toxins in the body. They are using this information in an effort to develop a preventive vaccine for travelers.

Resilient Marine Scientists Home Again as Lab Building Reopens after Harvey

Resilient Marine Scientists Home Again as Lab Building Reopens after Harvey

Being a marine scientist entails coping with extremes, from scuba diving deep in the ocean to interacting with living organisms that are among the planet's most mysterious creatures. Nonetheless, Hurricane Harvey was a whole new extreme for The University of Texas's Marine Science Institute. 

Racial and Ethnic Bias Leads to Lower Well-Being Among Adolescents

Racial and Ethnic Bias Leads to Lower Well-Being Among Adolescents

Racial and ethnic discrimination is problematic for all aspects of development — from mental and physical health to risky behaviors and academic success — particularly for Latinos, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin determined after analyzing findings from hundreds of previous studies on adolescents.

Common Weed Killer Linked to Bee Deaths

Common Weed Killer Linked to Bee Deaths

Honey bee. Credit: Alex Wild/University of Texas at Austin

The world's most widely used weed killer may also be indirectly killing bees. New research from The University of Texas at Austin shows that honey bees exposed to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, lose some of the beneficial bacteria in their guts and are more susceptible to infection and death from harmful bacteria.

Flu Season Forecasts Could Be More Accurate with Access to Health Care Companies’ Data

Flu Season Forecasts Could Be More Accurate with Access to Health Care Companies’ Data

In an era when for-profit companies collect a wealth of data about us, new research from The University of Texas at Austin shows that data collected by health care companies could — if made available to researchers and public health agencies — enable more accurate forecasts of when the next flu season will peak, how long it will last and how many people will get sick.

Kenneth Johnson Named Fellow of Biophysical Society

Kenneth Johnson Named Fellow of Biophysical Society

Molecular Biosciences professor Kenneth Johnson has been named a 2019 Society Fellow of The Biophysical Society for his influential research and support of biophysics.