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From the College of Natural Sciences

2015 Summer Blockbusters: Meet Our Science Truth Detector

2015 Summer Blockbusters: Meet Our Science Truth Detector

With summer movie season in full swing, cinema-goers are leaving theaters with one big question in mind: “Wait, could that really happen?”

Researchers Discover First Sensor of Earth’s Magnetic Field in an Animal

Researchers Discover First Sensor of Earth’s Magnetic Field in an Animal

A team of scientists and engineers at The University of Texas at Austin has identified the first sensor of the Earth’s magnetic field in an animal, finding in the brain of a tiny worm a big clue to a long-held mystery about how animals’ internal compasses work.

In Memoriam: Physicist Peter Antoniewicz

In Memoriam: Physicist Peter Antoniewicz
We were saddened to hear that physicist Peter Antoniewicz died on June 14.Peter Roman Antoniewicz was born February 5, 1936, in Tarnów, a city in southeastern Poland. He and his family immigrated to the U.S. in 1949. Antoniewicz received a Ph.D. in physics from Purdue University in 1965. His research focused on condensed matter physics...

Researchers Build World's Thinnest Light Bulb from Graphene

Researchers Build World's Thinnest Light Bulb from Graphene

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A team of scientists and engineers from Columbia University, Seoul National University (SNU), Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) and The University of Texas at Austin have demonstrated — for the first time — a visible light source using graphene, an atomically thin form of carbon. This new type of light source could form the basis of faster communications devices and computer displays that are thin, flexible and transparent.

Trash on Our Beaches Started With Us, and It Must End with Us

Trash on Our Beaches Started With Us, and It Must End with Us

iStock photo of garbage can on beachWorld Ocean Day was celebrated this week and people across the planet talked about how to keep water bottles, micro-trash and other plastics out of our oceans.

Freshman Researchers Receive Grand Challenges Explorations Grant

Freshman Researchers Receive Grand Challenges Explorations Grant

University of Texas at Austin freshmen, working to develop do-it-yourself health care diagnostics, make up a research group that was announced today as a Grand Challenges Explorations winner, through an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Thriving in Our Digital World

Thriving in Our Digital World
Calvin Lin The College Board and the National Science Foundation (NSF) recently announced they will expand their initiative to improve access to computer science education in high schools. Computer science skills are increasingly critical in the world today and the program is designed to strengthen these skills among students, especially gir...

UT Austin, International Partners Approve Start of Construction for Giant Magellan Telescope

UT Austin, International Partners Approve Start of Construction for Giant Magellan Telescope

The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) has announced a major milestone today with 11 international partners including The University of Texas at Austin unanimously approving its construction, securing the future of the project with more than $500 million to begin work on the world's most powerful optical telescope. The decision initiates final design and fabrication of the GMT, which is poised to become the largest optical telescope in existence.

Public Health Program Celebrates Fifth Anniversary

Public Health Program Celebrates Fifth Anniversary

As the College of Natural Sciences’ public health program celebrates its fifth anniversary this year, we visit with some of the people who know the program best.

Partly Human Yeast Show A Common Ancestor’s Lasting Legacy

Partly Human Yeast Show A Common Ancestor’s Lasting Legacy

Humanized Yeast illustrationDespite a billion years of evolution separating humans from the baker’s yeast in their refrigerators, hundreds of genes from an ancestor that the two species have in common live on nearly unchanged in them both, say biologists at The University of Texas at Austin. The team created thriving strains of genetically engineered yeast using human genes and found that certain groups of genes are surprisingly stable over evolutionary time.