News

From the College of Natural Sciences

Seahorse Heads Have a 'No Wake Zone' That’s Made for Catching Prey

Seahorse Heads Have a 'No Wake Zone' That’s Made for Catching Prey

Seahorses are slow, docile creatures, but their heads are perfectly shaped to sneak up and quickly snatch prey, according to marine scientists from The University of Texas at Austin.

Chemist and Computational Biologist Elected Fellows of National Science Organization

Chemist and Computational Biologist Elected Fellows of National Science Organization

Ron Elber and William Press.

Two College of Natural Sciences faculty members have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Scaling Theory Better Predicts Gas Production in Barnett Shale Wells

Scaling Theory Better Predicts Gas Production in Barnett Shale Wells

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a simple scaling theory to estimate gas production from hydraulically fractured wells in the Barnett Shale. The method is intended to help the energy industry accurately identify low- and high-producing horizontal wells, as well as accurately predict how long it will take for gas reserves to deplete in the wells.

This Longhorn Has Been Brought to You by DNA

This Longhorn Has Been Brought to You by DNA

In a set of two recent papers, Andy Ellington and his lab show how DNA can make pictures, but more importantly, that DNA circuits could someday be used to manufacture drugs or grow organs, such as a new heart.

Hungry Bats Spy on Neighbors to Find a Good Meal

Hungry Bats Spy on Neighbors to Find a Good Meal

Illustration by Jenna Luecke.

Before checking out a new restaurant or food cart, people turn to Yelp! or rely on old-fashioned reviews from friends and family. Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have found that bats do something similar, but only when their original dining source takes a turn for the worse.

Grasshopper Mice Are Numb to the Pain of the Bark Scorpion Sting

Grasshopper Mice Are Numb to the Pain of the Bark Scorpion Sting

The painful, potentially deadly stings of bark scorpions are nothing more than a slight nuisance to grasshopper mice, which voraciously kill and consume their prey with ease. When stung, the mice briefly lick their paws and move in again for the kill.

Texas Astronomer Discovers Most Distant Known Galaxy

Texas Astronomer Discovers Most Distant Known Galaxy

University of Texas at Austin astronomer Steven Finkelstein has led a team that has discovered and measured the distance to the most distant galaxy ever found. The galaxy is seen as it was at a time just 700 million years after the Big Bang.

Weddell Seals Hunting and Living Beneath Antarctic Ice

Weddell Seals Hunting and Living Beneath Antarctic Ice

A brief glimpse into the life of an Antarctic Weddell Seal with Ed Farrell.

Mammalian Body Cells Lack Ancient Viral Defense Mechanism, Find UT Scientists

Mammalian Body Cells Lack Ancient Viral Defense Mechanism, Find UT Scientists

A team led by Chris Sullivan, a professor of molecular biosciences at The University of Texas at Austin, has provided the first positive evidence that RNA interference (RNAi), a biological process in which small RNA molecules prevent genes from being expressed, does not play a role as an antiviral in most body, or “somatic,” cells in mammals.

Scientist-Artists Bring Animals to Life in Japanese-Inspired Prints

Scientist-Artists Bring Animals to Life in Japanese-Inspired Prints

Ring-Tailed Cat 3

Two researchers at the Texas Natural Science Center are combining art and science in a unique form that highlights a beauty in dead animals and animal biodiversity in Texas.