News

From the College of Natural Sciences
Invasive Plants Are Moving Targets

Invasive Plants Are Moving Targets

Left top: Healthy Senecio vulgaris growing in Calif. where it was introduced approximately 100 yrs ago. Left bottom: Dying Senecio vulgaris covered in Puccinia and Albugo pathogens, growing in part of its native range in the UK (from Calif. seed). Center top: Senecio squalidus growing in the UK where it invaded nearly 400 years ago, with some Pucci...
A Battle on Many Fronts

A Battle on Many Fronts

For every one of the researchers at The University of Texas at Austin involved in the study of infectious diseases, the challenge is a never-ending one. It’s a race to stay one step ahead of the mutations and transmission of the pathogenic microorganisms they’re analyzing in their labs, modeling on their laptops, and tracking around the world. Scie...infectious_krug
UTeach Celebrates Tenth Anniversary

UTeach Celebrates Tenth Anniversary

AUSTIN, Texas—UTeach, the nationally acclaimed program for preparing secondary teachers in mathematics, science and computer science, is celebrating ten years of success at The University of Texas at Austin. UTeach was established in 1997 as a new-and-improved way of introducing undergraduate math and science majors to secondary school teaching. T...
 Biology Professor Camille Parmesan Honored for Conservation Leadership

Biology Professor Camille Parmesan Honored for Conservation Leadership

AUSTIN, Texas — The nation's leading conservation education and advocacy group has honored Dr. Camille Parmesan, associate professor of integrative biology at The University of Texas at Austin, with its National Conservation Achievement Award for exemplary leadership in protecting the environment and natural resources. Parmesan was selected for her...
Biologist Parmesan Honored For Conservation Leadership

Biologist Parmesan Honored For Conservation Leadership

AUSTIN, Texas—The nation’s leading conservation education and advocacy group is honoring Dr. Camille Parmesan, associate professor of integrative biology at The University of Texas at Austin with its National Conservation Achievement Award for exemplary leadership in protecting the environment and natural resources. Parmesan was selected for her ...
Chang Appointed To Congressional Commission on Cyber Security

Chang Appointed To Congressional Commission on Cyber Security

Fred Chang AUSTIN, Texas—Dr. Fred Chang, research professor of computer sciences at The University of Texas at Austin, and Admiral Bobby Inman, the Lyndon B. Johnson Centennial Chair in National Policy at the LBJ School of Public Affairs, have been appointed to the new Commission on Cyber Security, established to make sure that the next president o...Fred Chang
UT Physicist and Colleagues Lead Five-Member Nanoscience Consortium

UT Physicist and Colleagues Lead Five-Member Nanoscience Consortium

AUSTIN, Texas–Researchers from the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and The University of Texas at Austin will explore ways to control optical energy for applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology as leaders of a five-university consortium awarded $1.4 million by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The Nanoscale Interdisciplinary Re...
Professors Elected to AAAS

Professors Elected to AAAS

AUSTIN, Texas—Four professors at The University of Texas at Austin have been elected as 2007 fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). AAAS fellows are chosen annually by their peers to recognize their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. This year’s fellows fro...
Marine Scientists Funded to Study 'Dead Zone'

Marine Scientists Funded to Study 'Dead Zone'

PORT ARANSAS, Texas— University of Texas at Austin marine scientists have been awarded $781,000 by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) to better understand how nutrient pollution from the Mississippi River affects the large area of low oxygen water called the “Dead Zone” in the Gulf of Mexico, and consequently its impact on comm...
Tolerance to Inhalants May Be Caused By Changes in Gene Expression

Tolerance to Inhalants May Be Caused By Changes in Gene Expression

Changes in the expression of genes may be the reason why people who abuse inhalants, such as spray paint or glue, quickly develop a tolerance, biologists at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered.