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From the College of Natural Sciences
The New Voice of StarDate

The New Voice of StarDate

StarDate Radio is announcing today that Billy Henry is the program's new voice. Henry, an Austin-based voice talent, musician, composer, and college lecturer, becomes the third narrator of the program in its 41-year history. He assumes the title from Sandy Wood, who retired from the program yesterday. Henry's first program airs today.

StarDate’s Sandy Wood to Retire

StarDate’s Sandy Wood to Retire

Sandy Wood, the popular and charismatic announcer of the StarDate radio program, is retiring after 28 years on the air. Her final episode will air July 16.

College Undergraduate Dean Wins National Award for Inclusive Leadership

College Undergraduate Dean Wins National Award for Inclusive Leadership

Senior Associate Dean David Vanden Bout won the 2019 Inclusive Leader Award.

David Vanden Bout, the College of Natural Sciences' senior associate dean for undergraduate education, has been named the inaugural winner of a prize recognizing outstanding leadership at a university for efforts in the areas of equity and inclusivity.

Looking Back on Apollo 11, Seeing UT Reflected in NASA History

Looking Back on Apollo 11, Seeing UT Reflected in NASA History

A seminal event in human history occurred 50 years ago this month when humans took their first steps on the Moon. This feat, the culmination of years of work by a multitude of people, happened with the involvement of many who started here in the University of Texas at Austin's College of Natural Sciences.

Two Natural Sciences Faculty Receive 2019 Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Awards

Two Natural Sciences Faculty Receive 2019 Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Awards

David Laude and Alison Norman are recipients of the 2019 University of Texas Regents' Outstanding Teaching Awards.

Two faculty members from The University of Texas at Austin, both from the College of Natural Sciences, have been chosen to receive 2019 Regents' Outstanding Teaching Awards by the Board of Regents of The University of Texas System. The recipients are David Laude, a Distinguished Teaching Professor in chemistry, and Alison Norman, associate professor of instruction in computer science.

Keck Foundation Awards Chemists Grant to Squeeze More Energy from Sunlight

Keck Foundation Awards Chemists Grant to Squeeze More Energy from Sunlight

The W.M. Keck Foundation has awarded a $1 million grant to a team led by University of Texas at Austin chemists to develop an innovative new coating for silicon-based solar cells that could boost their efficiency by as much as 20%. It's a bold research challenge that, so far, no one else has figured out how to do — but if successful, could make solar power generation cheaper.

Turning Plant Pests into Helpers

Turning Plant Pests into Helpers

As any farmer or summer gardener knows, tiny aphids represent an enemy for most crops. The insects like many of the same plants that we rely on for food, and aphids can sometimes spread plant diseases, similar to the way mosquitos spread human diseases.

Computer Security Expert Named Simons Foundation Investigator

Computer Security Expert Named Simons Foundation Investigator

Brent Waters has been selected as a 2019 Simons Investigator in Theoretical Computer Science.

Computer scientist Brent Waters of The University of Texas at Austin has been selected as a 2019 Simons Investigator in Theoretical Computer Science by the Simons Foundation, for his work in cryptography and computer security.

New AI Sees Like a Human, Filling in the Blanks (Updated)

New AI Sees Like a Human, Filling in the Blanks (Updated)

Computer scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have taught an artificial intelligence agent how to do something that usually only humans can do—take a few quick glimpses around and infer its whole environment, a skill necessary for the development of effective search-and-rescue robots that one day can improve the effectiveness of dangerous missions.

Decoding a Drop of Water to Understand Life on the Texas Coast

Decoding a Drop of Water to Understand Life on the Texas Coast

Volunteers Melissa and Elsa Temples collect marine samples as participants in 2019 Texas BioBlitz. Credit: Kelley Savage

You can swim, but you can't hide. Even hard to find living things in the bays and estuaries in the Coastal Bend are being identified as researchers from The University of Texas Marine Science Institute (UTMSI), Mission-Aransas Reserve, and Texas A&M University Corpus Christi (TAMUCC) team up with the Smithsonian Institution's Marine GEO (Global Earth Observatory) program for an ambitious project to identify precisely what lives in the near-shore waters.