News

From the College of Natural Sciences

New Approach May Spot Counterfeit Olive Oil, Help Pre-Diabetics

New Approach May Spot Counterfeit Olive Oil, Help Pre-Diabetics

Just days after new dietary guidelines came out telling Americans to pay more attention to the types of fats, not the amounts, that they eat, scientists announced they've found a new, better and faster way to detect distinctions in the fats found in food.

Two Natural Sciences Faculty Receive 2015 Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Awards

Two Natural Sciences Faculty Receive 2015 Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Awards

Eleven faculty members from The University of Texas at Austin, two of whom are from the College of Natural Sciences, have been chosen to receive 2015 Regents' Outstanding Teaching Awards by the Board of Regents of The University of Texas System.

The Mystery of the Brownbanded Bamboo Shark

The Mystery of the Brownbanded Bamboo Shark

All week, sharks splashed across TV screens as viewers who love (or fear) the kings of the sea tuned into shows about the allure (or revulsion) of great whites, hamnmerheads, makos and more. But if you want to unravel a great shark mystery – and learn why it gives researchers hope about the future of threatened shark populations – turn off your TV and listen to what this UT student helped discover.

Graduate Students’ Class Project Produces New Tool for Neuroscience

Graduate Students’ Class Project Produces New Tool for Neuroscience

As new graduate students in the neuroscience department, Kenneth Latimer and Jacob Yates did a class project in a business class that eventually resulted in a prestigious publication in the journal Science, as well as a new tool for neuroscience.

Settlement by Oil Company BP to Support Gulf Coast Research

Settlement by Oil Company BP to Support Gulf Coast Research

Oil company BP announced it would settle a number of federal and state lawsuits with plans to pay over $1 billion annually for the next 18 years toward research, clean-up and restoration along the Gulf Coast. The University of Texas at Austin's Marine Science Institute is leading one of the research consortiums on deck to receive support.

Audio: Fun With Chemistry

Audio: Fun With Chemistry

Meet chemistry lecturer Kate Biberdorf, founder of the wildly popular outreach program Fun With Chemistry. Learn more at: Fun With Chemistry

Longer Acquaintance Levels the Romantic Playing Field

Longer Acquaintance Levels the Romantic Playing Field

NYT-Science-RaePartners who become romantically involved soon after meeting tend to be more similar in physical attractiveness than partners who get together after knowing each other for a while, a team at the University of Texas at Austin and Northwestern University has found.

New Device Bends Light at Sharp Angles

New Device Bends Light at Sharp Angles

Most modern computers and communications devices use electrons to transmit and process information. But when they're crammed onto smaller and smaller devices, electrons become unruly, generating a lot of heat. Scientists have long dreamed of replacing electrons with particles of light called photons. Because photons don't generate much heat and move at light speed, computer chips could theoretically be made much smaller and faster than current chips.

Scientists Create New Tool to Study Emerging Materials for Spintronics

Scientists Create New Tool to Study Emerging Materials for Spintronics

As traditional electronics begin to reach their physical limits of compactness and speed, scientists and engineers are looking for new ways to stay on track with Moore's Law. One possible solution is to develop spintronics, devices that use a property of electrons known as spin to represent the 0's and 1's in computers. A class of materials called topological insulators (TIs) might have the right properties for spintronics, but since they were discovered less than a decade ago, scientists still know little about their properties.

Corals Are Already Adapting to Global Warming, Scientists Say

Corals Are Already Adapting to Global Warming, Scientists Say

Some coral populations already have genetic variants necessary to tolerate warm ocean waters, and humans can help to spread these genes, a team of scientists from The University of Texas at Austin, the Australian Institute of Marine Science and Oregon State University has found.