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From the College of Natural Sciences
NOAA Helps UT Marine Science Institute Rebound from Hurricane Harvey

NOAA Helps UT Marine Science Institute Rebound from Hurricane Harvey

Construction workers rebuilding the UT Marine Science Institute in May 2019.

PORT ARANSAS, Texas – After more than two years of roof repairs, window installations and building reinforcements, the scientists, staff members and students at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute (UTMSI) have an end in sight for their ongoing effort to rebuild after Hurricane Harvey, thanks to help from the U.S. Congress.

Statistician Abhra Sarkar Receives Mitchell Prize

Statistician Abhra Sarkar Receives Mitchell Prize

Abhra Sarkar was awarded the 2018 Mitchell Prize for his research in animal vocalization modelling. Photo credit: Vivian Abagiu.

Abhra Sarkar, assistant professor of statistics and data sciences at the University of Texas at Austin, was awarded the 2018 Mitchell Prize by the International Society for Bayesian Analysis in August for his research in animal vocalization modelling.

Elaborate Komodo Dragon Armor Defends Against Other Dragons

Elaborate Komodo Dragon Armor Defends Against Other Dragons

Just beneath their scales, Komodo dragons wear a suit of armor made of tiny bones. These bones cover the dragons from head to tail, creating a "chain mail" that protects the giant predators. However, the armor raises a question: What does the world's largest lizard – the dominant predator in its natural habitat – need protection from?

Michael Krische Receives American Chemical Society Award

Michael Krische Receives American Chemical Society Award

Michael Krische, professor of chemistry and the Robert A. Welch Chair in Science at The University of Texas at Austin, is the 2020 recipient of the American Chemical Society's Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry.

5 Ways UT Science is Fighting Back on Microplastics

5 Ways UT Science is Fighting Back on Microplastics

On a clear day on the beach in Port Aransas, Jace Tunnell noticed clear and multi-colored pellets collecting on the sand at the high tide line. On closer inspection, he discovered the pellets were tiny, round bits of plastic. And there looked to be millions of them.

Texas Organization Donates Millions to UT Austin Cancer-Fighting Research

Texas Organization Donates Millions to UT Austin Cancer-Fighting Research

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin will head into September, childhood cancer awareness month, with nearly $5 million in new cancer prevention funding from the State of Texas.

Newly Discovered Giant Planet Slingshots Around its Star

Newly Discovered Giant Planet Slingshots Around its Star

Harlan J. Smith Telescope at the University of Texas at Austin's McDonald Observatory. Photo credit: Bill Nowlin Photography.

Astronomers at The University of Texas at Austin's McDonald Observatory, along with colleagues at Caltech and elsewhere, have discovered a planet three times the mass of Jupiter that travels on a long, egg-shaped path around its star. If this planet were somehow placed into our own solar system, it would swing from within our asteroid belt to out beyond Neptune. Other giant planets with highly elliptical orbits have been found around other stars, but none of those worlds were located at the very outer reaches of their star systems like this one.

Kami Hull Seeks to Make Drugs Faster with Less Waste

Kami Hull Seeks to Make Drugs Faster with Less Waste

New faculty in Natural Sciences conduct compelling research and inspire new generations, right out of the gate. As the 2019-20 academic year begins, we are introducing faculty members whose compelling work is worth learning about. Here meet Kami Hull. Within months of joining the faculty, she won a prestigious Novartis Early Career Award in Chemistry in recognition of her research, which involves developing more efficient processes for synthetic organic chemistry.

UT Austin Mathematician Wins Clay Research Award

UT Austin Mathematician Wins Clay Research Award

The Clay Mathematics Institute has awarded Philip Isett, a mathematics faculty member at The University of Texas at Austin and Caltech, the Clay Research Award. Isett received the prestigious award jointly with two other mathematicians in recognition of their shared contributions to "the analysis of partial differential equations" that are relevant to a mathematical understanding of moving fluids.

Explaining the Science: The Potential of Bacteriophages in a Post-Antibiotics World

Explaining the Science: The Potential of Bacteriophages in a Post-Antibiotics World

As antibiotic-resistant bacteria, like MRSA and resistant strains of tuberculosis and gonorrhea, become more prevalent, health officials are wondering how long antibiotics will be able to hold up against their bacterial foes. And what comes next?