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The Freshman Research Initiative has dozens of research streams in which students work alongside scientists to make discoveries. For a glimpse of all current research streams and the faculty members and research educators leading them, search or browse below, or you can browse by Full Stream Name using this PDF guide.

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Antibiotics

Antibiotics

Aptamer

Aptamer 

Credit Options:

Spring: BIO206L & NSC109 OR CH204 & NSC109

Fall: BIO377 OR CH369K

Autonomous Robots

Autonomous Robots

Big Data in Biology

Big Data in Biology

Credit Options: Spring and Fall

Bioactive Molecules

Bioactive Molecules

Credit Option: Spring: CH204 & NSC109 (W 1-2PM), Fall: BIO377 or CH369K or CH220C

BioBricks

Biobricks

Credit Options: Spring: BIO206L & NSC109, CH204 & NSC109, Fall: BIO377 & CH369K

Biofuels

Biofuels

Credit Options: Spring: BIO206L & NSC109, Fall: BIO377

Biomedical Imaging and Analysis (Formerly Brain Pathology)

BIOMEDICAL IMAGING AND ANALYSIS

Credit Option: NSC 309 Lab Meeting Time: M 4-5 PM

Bioprospecting

Bioprospecting 

Credit Options: Spring: BIO206L & NSC109, CH204 & NSC109, Fall: BIO377 & CH369K

Bugs in Bugs

Bugs in Bugs

Credit Options: Spring: BIO206L & NSC109 (M 4-5PM), Fall: BIO377

 

Computational Design

Computational Design

Credit Option: Spring: CS 378, Fall: CS 378

Computational Evolution

Computational Evolution

What can the evolution of self-replicating computer programs tell us about evolution in nature?

Research on self-replicating computer programs (digital organisms) enables students to experience evolution in action and to perform evolutionary experiments that would take years to complete with natural organisms.  Digital organisms evolve to perform computational tasks. Completion of these tasks rewards the organisms with resources they can use to replicate faster and gain a competitive edge.  Over time, faster-replicating organisms out-compete slower-replicating ones. Hence, the organisms evolve to complete increasingly complex tasks, in a manner that parallels the evolution of natural organisms.  This stream is a good option for students who want to learn about computer science and evolutionary biology. This stream will be accepting transfer students for the 2014/2015 academic year.

Click here to read more about the Computational Evolution Stream.

Credit Options: BIO 321 or CS 378  Lab Meeting Time: M 4–5 PM

Computational Nanoparticles

Computational Nanoparticles

Can we design better catalysts from nanoparticles?

This stream uses computation models to calculate the properties of nanoparticles and the chemical reactions that they catalyze. Students will be able to construct their own particles, each with a different composition and structure, and use quantum chemistry calculations to evaluate their properties in order to design new catalysts. Students may also design and investigate novel methods for finding the most stable configuration of atoms in nanoparticles. This stream also works in conjunction with an experimental nanoparticle stream. Students who find particularly promising catalytic nanoparticles will have the opportunity to synthesize their particles in the lab. Wacth the stream video here.

Click here to read more about the Computational Nanoparticles Stream.

Credit Option: CH 204/CH 108 Lab Meeting Time: M 3-4 pm

Cosmic Dawn: How the first galaxies formed, ended the dark ages, and reionized the Universe

Cosmic Dawn: How The First Galaxies Formed, Ended The Dark Ages, and Reionized the Universe

This stream is not available for spring 2015 What are the differences between galaxies born and raised in regions of space that were either crowded or sparse, and how did these differences affect the end of the cosmic dark ages?

 

Prof. Shapiro's group studies the first billion years of cosmic time when the first galaxies and stars were born, the last window of cosmic time accessible to direct observation.  To test current theory, they use supercomputers to simulate the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure in the expanding universe. When these galaxies formed stars, starlight escaped into the surrounding gas, heating and ionizing it.  This "feedback" impacted future galaxy and star formation and left observable imprints on the universe which astronomers are just now beginning to detect. Students will help make new discoveries with the most advanced simulations in the world, performed at the Texas Advanced Computing Center at UT. 

Click here to read more about the Cosmic Dawn Stream.

Credit Options: PHY 101L/AST 210K or CS 378 or AST375K Lab Meeting Times: M & W 2–3 PM

Cyber Security

Cyber Security 

Credit Option: Spring: CS 378  (TTH 9:30-11AM), Fall: CS 378

Discovering Signals

Discovering Signals 

Credit Options: Spring: BIO206L & NSC109 (Th 2:30-3:30PM), Fall: BIO377

DIY Diagnostics

DIY Diagnostics

Credit Options: Spring: BIO206L & NSC109, or CH204 & NSC109 (T 3:30-4:30PM), Fall: BIO377 or CH369K or CS378

 

Fish Behavior

Fish Behavior

Measuring the coevolution of cognition and behavioral tradeoffs in fish

Functional Genomics

Functional Genomics 

Credit Options: Spring: BIO206L & NSC109, CH204 & NSC109, Fall: BIO377 & CH369K

Gene Detectives

Gene Detectives

 

Gene Networks

Gene Networks

Credit Options: Spring: BIO206L & NSC109 CH204 & NSC109 (M 3-4PM), Fall: CH369K & NSC 109

Genome Engineering

Genome Engineering

Credit Option: Spring:BIO206L & NSC109Fall: BIO 377

Luminators

Luminators

Credit Options: Spring: CH204 & NSC109 (F 2-3PM), Fall: CH369K

Magnetic Matter

Magnetic Matter

Credit Options: Spring: PHY 101L & PHY 108, or PHY 116L & PHY 108 (M 4-5 PM), Fall: PHY 308F

Microbe Hackers

 Microbe Hacking 

Credit Options: Spring: BIO206L & NSC109, or CH204 & NSC109, Fall: BIO377 or CH369K

Molecular Switches

Molecular Switches

Course Options: Spring: BIO206L & NSC109 (M 3-4PM), Fall: BIO377

Nano Chemistry

Nano Chemistry

Credit Options: Spring: CH204 & NSC109 (M 3-4PM), Fall: CH369K

Neuroscience of Synapses

NEUROSCIENCE OF SYNAPSES

How do brain cells (neurons) and their connections (synapses) mediate learning and memory?

Synapses form neural circuits in the brain. Nanoscale imaging in the electron microscope is needed to determine where synapses are located and whether changes in synapse structure and composition are associated with learning and memory. Students engaged in this stream learn to identify, reconstruct in 3D, measure and analyze neuronal structures including: dendrites, axons, synapses, and subcellular components involved in synapse function. Opportunities exist to engineer improved computer imaging tools. Projects provide a strong foundation for understanding fundamental brain mechanisms. This stream will be accepting transfer students for the 2014/2015 academic year.

Visit the SynapseWeb for more information.

Credit Options: NSC 309, BIO 206L/BIO 102C  Lab Meeting Time: T 4:00 PM

Plant Pathways

Plant Pathways

Credit Options: Spring: BIO206L & NSC109, Fall: BIO377

Practical Sensors

Practical Sensors

Supra Sensors

Supra Sensors

Credit Options: Spring: CH204 & NSC109 or BIO206L & NSC109, Fall: BIO377 & CH369K

Symmetry

Symmetry

Credit Option: Spring: M375T, Fall: The Directed Reading Program

Virtual Chemistry

Virtual Chemistry 

Credit Options: Spring: CH369K, Fall: CH369K

Virtual Cures

 Virtual Cures

White Dwarf Stars

White Dwarf Stars

Credit Options: Spring: PHY101L & AST210K, Fall: AST375

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