WHAT WE WANT YOU TO LEARN IN ALL OF YOUR BIOLOGY CLASSES

Process of Science: Engage in the process of science by practicing observation, generating hypotheses, designing testable experiments and manipulating data.

Quantitative Reasoning: Manipulate numerical data and evaluate the significance of the data using appropriate mathematical and/or statistical methods.

Critical Thinking: Use logical reasoning to apply known concepts to novel situations and to identify and evaluate source materials and scholarly literature.

Independent Learning: Demonstrate personal responsibility to set goals and regularly engage in self-assessment of progress towards academic accomplishment.

Exchange of Ideas: Collaborate, discuss, and exchange ideas in a team setting in order to explore creative solutions to complex problems.

Biology and Society: Apply biological concepts to daily life and issues in society.

 

 

COURSES BY DEPARTMENT

 

Biology Instructional Office Courses

Majors Introductory Courses

BIO 311C: INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY I

Introduction to biological energy transformation, cell structure and physiology, and gene expression. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester.Only one of the following may be counted: Biology 301L211311CBiology 311C and 212 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Chemistry 301 or 301H.

BIO 311D: INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY II

Introduction to mechanisms of inheritance, evolution, physiology, and species interactions. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Biology 301L and 311D may not both be counted. Biology 301M and 311D may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 311C with a grade of at least C-.

BIO 206L: INTRO LAB EXPERIMENT IN BIOLOGY

The organizing principles of biology (such as molecular and cellular functions, reproduction, development, homeostatic mechanisms, and organismal physiology and behavior) are used within a comparative and evolutionary framework to train students in modern laboratory techniques, bioinformatics, experimental design, and interpretation of results. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Biology 311C or 311D.

BIO 325: GENETICS

Basic principles of Mendelism, molecular genetics, structure and function of genes and chromosomes, populations and evolution. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Biology 325 and 325H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 311C and 311D with a grade of at least C- in each.

BIO 325L: LAB EXPERIENCE IN GENETICS

Experimentation and direct observation in fundamental aspects of transmission genetics. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: The following with a grade of at least C-: Biology 325 or 325H, and Biology 206L208L226L, or Environmental Sciences 311.

BIO 315H: ADVANCED INTRO TO GENETICS: HONORS

Basic principles of genetics and cell biology. Emphasis on gene structure and regulation; transmission of heritable traits; structure and function of cells; bacterial and viral genetics; and recombinant DNA technology. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Prerequisite: A score of 5 on the College Board Advanced Placement Examination in Biology and credit or registration for Chemistry 301 or 301H.

BIO 325H: GENETICS: HONORS

Basic principles of genetics and evolution. Emphasis on population genetics and natural selection; structure and function of organ systems; behavioral ecology; and mutational analysis of organismal development. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. Biology 325 and 325H may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Biology 315H with a grade of at least C-.

BIO 372C: BIOLOGY PEER MENTORS IN RESEARCH/TRAINING

Students work as peer mentors and assistants in the teaching of biology, with emphasis on developing instructional materials that teach fundamental biology with real world data. Students mentor students for at least three hours a week in addition to other weekly meetings. Prerequisite: Biology 311C311D, and Biology 325, or Biology 315H and 325H with a grade of at least B in each; and consent of the undergraduate adviser.

Integrative Biology Courses 

Lower Division Courses

BIO 208L: FIELD BIOLOGY

Field projects, laboratory exercises, field trips, and computer simulation exercises to acquaint students with the principles and applications of ecology and some of the experimental and descriptive methods of ecological investigations. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for Biology 311D.

 

Marine Science Courses

Lower Division Courses

MNS 307: INTRODUCTION TO OCEANOGRAPHY

Introduction to the sciences of oceanography: geological, physical, and biological. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Marine Sciences 307 and Geological Sciences 307 may not both be counted.

MNS 308: HUMANS AND A CHANGING OCEAN

The consequences of human-induced alteration of the marine environment including the impact on fisheries, marine mammals, food-web changes, and changes in species composition and ecological function will be explored. Designed for non-science majors. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Marine Sciences 309 (Topic: Humans and a Changing Ocean) and 308 may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Marine Sciences 307 (or Geological Sciences 307).

MNS 310: FUNDAMENTALS OF MARINE SCIENCE

Designed for students pursuing a degree option in Marine and Freshwater Science. In-depth introduction to physical, chemical, geological, and biological processes in marine systems. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Biology 311D and Chemistry 302 or 302H.

Molecular Biosciences Courses

MBS Course Descriptions 

Lower Division Courses

 BCH 206K: UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH

Introduction to research practices; supervised individual undergraduate research in biochemistry. Six to ten laboratory hours a week for one semester.

  • May be taken for a letter grade no more than twice. No more than six semester hours may be counted toward a degree in biochemistry. May be repeated for credit.  

Neuroscience Courses

Upper Division Courses

BIO 367C: CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BASIS OF NEURAL DEVELOPMENT

An introduction to the principles by which the neural tube (brain and spinal cord) forms during embryonic development. Subjects include the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of a three-dimensional neural tube and its division into forebrain, midbrain, hindbrain, and spinal cord. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. 

BIO 371L: EXPERIMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY

Experimental approach to physiological mechanisms by which animals adapt to their environment. One lecture hour, four laboratory hours, and two hours of computer work a week for one semester.

NEU 330: NEURAL SYSTEMS I 

Introduction to the nervous system with an emphasis on brain organization, neuron physiology, perceptual systems, and motor systems. Intended for neuroscience majors and those considering neuroscience as a major. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

NEU 335: NEURAL SYSTEMS II

Introduction to the nervous system with an emphasis on neural development and on the neural mechanisms of memory, emotions, and other higher cognitive functions. Intended for neuroscience majors and those considering neuroscience as a major. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. 

 NEU 365D: PRINCIPLES OF DRUG ACTION

Introduction to the basic principles of pharmacology; including how drugs get into the body, exert their actions, and are metabolized and excreted. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. 

NEU 365L: NEUROBIOLOGY LABORATORY

An introduction to physiological, morphological, and molecular techniques used for analysis of the nervous system. Experiments and computer simulations illustrate basics of information processing by the nervous system. Four laboratory hours and one discussion hour a week for one semester. 

NEU 365T: NEUROBIOLOGY OF DISEASE

The neurobiological basis of disorders of the brain, with the main focus on mental illness. Emphasizes the neural circuitries and neurochemical events that underlie specific mental processes and behaviors. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.  

NEU 365W: NEUROBIOLOGY OF ADDICTION

Study of the neurobiology of neurotransmitters, and the influence of alcohol and drugs of abuse on neurotransmitters. Three lecture hours a week for one semester. 

NEU 366C: ION CHANNELS & THE MOLECULAR PHYSICS OF NEURONAL SIGNALING

Explores the role of molecular conformational changes in higher-level neuronal function and sensory transduction, including the generation and regulation of diverse types of neuronal signaling characteristics. Emphasizes a quantitative approach and the use of models to study function. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

NEU 366D: SYNAPTIC PHYSIOLOGY & PLASTICITY

Detailed study of the physiology of synaptic transmission in the mammalian central nervous system. Covers dendritic integration and various forms and mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

NEU 366E: VISUAL NEUROSCIENCE

Physiology of the visual pathway and its relationship to visual perception; prospects for prevention of blinding eye diseases; functional and ecological adaptations of primate vision. Laboratory experiments and demonstrations illustrate and extend lecture topics and include measurement of several aspects of students' own visual and sensorimotor function. One and one-half lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester.

NEU 366L: NEUROIMAGING LABORATORY

Basic principles of image formation and techniques of fluorescent imaging and confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Includes image processing and analysis to extract quantitative information from digital images. Survey of imaging techniques, including electron microscopy and functional MRI. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours a week for one semester.

NEU 466M: QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN NEUROSCIENCE I

Overview of the basic mathematical and computational tools central to the analysis of neural systems in a laboratory setting. Subjects include linear algebra, differential equations, filtering, correlation, probability, and inference, with an emphasis on quantitative methodology and applications to neuroscience. Three lecture hours and one and one-half laboratory hours a week for one semester.

NEU 366N: QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN NEUROSCIENCE II

Continuation of Neuroscience 466M. Introduction to basic mathematical and computational tools for the analysis of neural systems. Subjects include computational and quantitative methods, with an emphasis on their applications to neuroscience. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour a week for one semester. 

NEU 366P: LABORATORY IN PSYCHOPHYSICS

Studies the principles of experimental design, execution, and interpretation by having students measure their own perceptual and behavioral responses to visual and auditory tests. Includes data analysis, statistical significance, and interpretation. Five laboratory hours a week for one semester.

NEU 366S: NEOROMOLECULAR GENETICS & DISEASE LAB

Explores techniques used to study the molecular genetic basis for nervous system function and disease with a powerful invertebrate model system. Subjects will range from studying the conserved molecular basis for our senses and male/female-specific behaviors, to exploring how mutations of conserved neural genes cause neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Six laboratory hours a week for one semester. 

 NEU 367F: FOUNDATIONS OF HUMAN NEUROIMAGING

Survey of methods for neuroimaging research. Describes the physics of MRI image acquisition, the physiology of neural responses, and the design and analysis of MRI studies. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

 NEU 367V: EVOLUTIONARY NEUROBIOLOGY

Examination of the nervous system in an evolutionary context. Three lecture hours a week for one semester.

NEU 379H: HONORS TUTORIAL COURSE

Restricted to students in the honors program in neuroscience. Original laboratory research project under the direction of a faculty mentor leading to a thesis or research presentation. The equivalent of one, two, or three lecture hours a week for one semester.

  • May be repeated for credit, but no more than six hours may be counted toward a degree in neuroscience.
  • Prerequisite: Consent of student's research supervisor and the departmental honors adviser.

NEU 466G: FUNCTIONAL & SYNAPTIC NEUROANATOMY

Neuroanatomy and functional connectivity as a basis for brain function and behavior examined from gross structure, cytology, and nanoscale synaptic connectivity in the somatosensory, motor, visual, auditory, olfactory, taste, limbic, vestibular, hypothalamus, and other symptoms. Examination of the synaptic basis of learning and memory, fear, sleep, stress, and synaptic changes during development, aging, mental retardation, and neurological diseases. Laboratory projects involve three-dimensional reconstructions from serial section electron microscopy. Three lecture hours and one and one half laboratory hours a week for one semester.

 

 

 

For questions regarding courses and registration, please send us an email!