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Audio: Saving the Bees, Two Perspectives

As bees sharply decline around the world, two researchers are taking very different approaches to understand -- and potentially reverse -- this troubling trend. One is studying the microbes that live inside bees and help protect them against infections. The other is studying the links between changing landscapes and bee health.


Learn more about the two professors of integrative biology featured in today's show: Shalene Jha and Nancy Moran.

Point of Discovery is a production of the University of Texas at Austin's College of Natural Sciences. You can subscribe to the podcast via iTunes, iTunes U or RSS. Or listen on Stitcher. Questions or comments about this episode or our series in general? Email Marc Airhart.


Below are photos of the bees on Patterson Hall taken by Marsha Miller and Vivian Abagiu.


Below, you can watch a video from the Hidden UT series, about the bees that live atop Patterson Hall:

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Comments 2

 
Guest - don coats on Friday, 04 March 2016 09:59

Hi Mark,
it was an entertaining report but there could have been a stronger emphasis on creating more habitat by those who could actually make a contribution in their own yards, parks and many public places. There is a landscape value perception problem in our culture that if changed, could really make a difference in providing bee habitat. AND THE RELATIONSHIP STORIES at that level CAN BE FASCINATING TO STUDENTS OF ALL AGES. WE NEED TO REDIRECT THE PUBLIC ATTENTION FROM MEGAFAUNA TO MICRO. The lens and digital technology makes if very accessible. I'm a serious beekeeper with 20 hives but have learned that honey bees are a small part of the declined pollinator problem and actually a distraction. Please take a look at what Xerces Society has to offer.

Don Coats, DVM

Hi Mark, it was an entertaining report but there could have been a stronger emphasis on creating more habitat by those who could actually make a contribution in their own yards, parks and many public places. There is a landscape value perception problem in our culture that if changed, could really make a difference in providing bee habitat. AND THE RELATIONSHIP STORIES at that level CAN BE FASCINATING TO STUDENTS OF ALL AGES. WE NEED TO REDIRECT THE PUBLIC ATTENTION FROM MEGAFAUNA TO MICRO. The lens and digital technology makes if very accessible. I'm a serious beekeeper with 20 hives but have learned that honey bees are a small part of the declined pollinator problem and actually a distraction. Please take a look at what Xerces Society has to offer. Don Coats, DVM
Marc G Airhart on Friday, 04 March 2016 10:25

Hi Don,

Thanks for the feedback. I agree completely. There is a lot that can be done to increase the availability of foraging plants for native bees by homeowners, farmers and those who manage lands of any size.

Best regards,
Marc

Hi Don, Thanks for the feedback. I agree completely. There is a lot that can be done to increase the availability of foraging plants for native bees by homeowners, farmers and those who manage lands of any size. Best regards, Marc
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Thursday, 19 October 2017

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