News

From the College of Natural Sciences

Researchers Identify "Carbohydrates in a Coalmine" for Cancer Detection

Researchers Identify

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Researchers at New York University and the University of Texas at Austin have discovered that carbohydrates serve as identifiers for cancer cells. Their findings, which appear in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show how these molecules may serve as signals for cancer and explain what’s going on inside these cells, pointing to new ways in which sugars function as a looking glass into the workings of their underlying structures.

Head Room: Department of Chemistry Glassblowing Shop

Head Room: Department of Chemistry Glassblowing Shop

Mike Ronalter and Adam Kennedy discuss the balance between art and craft in their experience as scientific glassblowers in the Department of Chemistry at The University of Texas at Austin. The glassblowing shop is critical for chemistry researchers, with their daily needs for various shapes and styles of glass for their projects.

Three Natural Sciences Faculty Receive Sloan Fellowships

Three Natural Sciences Faculty Receive Sloan Fellowships

Three faculty members in the College of Natural Sciences have recently been awarded 2014 Sloan Research Fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Crazy Ants Dominate Fire Ants by Neutralizing Their Venom

Crazy Ants Dominate Fire Ants by Neutralizing Their Venom

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Invasive “crazy ants” are rapidly displacing fire ants in areas across the southeastern U.S. by secreting a compound that neutralizes fire ant venom, according to a University of Texas at Austin study published this week in the journal Science Express. It’s the first known example of an insect with the ability to detoxify another insect’s venom.

The Ultimate in High Speed Cinematography Reveals Laser Gymnastics at Speed of Light

The Ultimate in High Speed Cinematography Reveals Laser Gymnastics at Speed of Light

Scientists in the Department of Physics have captured the ultimate high-speed movie of a laser pulse as it zips through a piece of glass at the speed of light. The new imaging technique will help scientists understand how intense laser pulses propagate through air, glass fibers and fusion pellets, and thus could have applications in atmospheric chemical analysis, fiber optic communications, and power generation.

Alumna Donna Nelson on Chemistry and Breaking Bad

Alumna Donna Nelson on Chemistry and Breaking Bad

***To view video of Dr. Nelson as the inaugural speaker for the Pioneering Leadership Lecture Series, click HERE ***

Meet alumna Donna Nelson, a chemistry professor at the University of Oklahoma (which we forgive her for) and science advisor for the popular TV show, "Breaking Bad."

Brain Scans Show We Take Risks Because We Can't Stop Ourselves

Brain Scans Show We Take Risks Because We Can't Stop Ourselves

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A new study correlating brain activity with how people make decisions suggests that when individuals engage in risky behavior, such as drunk driving or unsafe sex, it's probably not because their brains' desire systems are too active, but because their self-control systems are not active enough.

You Are Your Microbiome

You Are Your Microbiome

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Have you ever felt not completely like yourself? You’re not alone. In fact, you’re never really alone. No matter how hard you may try, you’re always in the company of 100 trillion microbial friends.

Ruth Buskirk: Biologist and Teacher

Ruth Buskirk: Biologist and Teacher

From Costa Rica to Painter Hall, biology faculty member Ruth Buskirk has impacted the lives of countless students.

Mason Hankamer's Life In Color

Mason Hankamer's Life In Color

Meet senior neuroscience and jazz performance major Mason Hankamer, who sees music in colors.