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The Towering RLM

The Towering RLM
R. L. Moore at his desk circa 1928. Photo: J.C. Dorroh, courtesy of Center for American History.
R. L. Moore at his desk circa 1928. Photo: J.C. Dorroh, courtesy of Center for American History.

Walking around campus, it’s hard to ignore RLM Hall—a towering 1970’s-era building with its backbone of elevators crowded full of physicists, mathematicians and astronomers clutching coffee cups and class notes. And fittingly, RLM is named for a towering figure in mathematics research and education, Robert Lee Moore.

Moore (1882-1974) is recognized internationally for his pioneering inquiry-based teaching method dubbed the Moore Method. His method encourages students to solve problems creatively without listening to long didactic lectures and with minimal opening of textbooks.

“That student is taught the best who is told the least,” said Moore in a 1966 video called “Challenge in the Classroom.”

The Moore Method lives on today across the country and at the College of Natural Sciences through two projects in mathematics, the Discovery Learning Project and the Inquiry-Based Learning Project, both of which aim to get students to accept responsibility for their own learning and become comfortable with challenging and unfamiliar problems.

Learn more about the current programs at www.discovery.utexas.edu.
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Monday, 20 November 2017

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