Button to scroll to the top of the page.

Updates

News

From the College of Natural Sciences
Super-resolution Microscope Builds 3D Images by Mapping Negative Space

Super-resolution Microscope Builds 3D Images by Mapping Negative Space

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have demonstrated a method for making three-dimensional images of structures in biological material under natural conditions at a much higher resolution than other existing methods. The method may help shed light on how cells communicate with one another and provide important insights for engineers working to develop artificial organs such as skin or heart tissue.

Iran Releases Former UT Physicist

Iran Releases Former UT Physicist

​Iranian authorities released Omid Kokabee, former doctoral student in physics at The University of Texas at Austin, on Monday after more than five years of imprisonment according to reports by multiple outlets including the Associated Press.

Tags:
College Welcomes New Faculty for 2016-17 Academic Year

College Welcomes New Faculty for 2016-17 Academic Year

The College of Natural Sciences welcomes several new tenured and tenure-track faculty members this fall. Whether improving the performance and reliability of computers, investigating phases of matter, or revealing the impact of climate change on plant and animal life, these diligent and innovative scientists build on the college's reputation for groundbreaking research and research-based teaching.
Scientists Glimpse Inner Workings of Atomically Thin Transistors

Scientists Glimpse Inner Workings of Atomically Thin Transistors

With an eye to the next generation of tech gadgetry, a team of physicists at The University of Texas at Austin has had the first-ever glimpse into what happens inside an atomically thin semiconductor device. In doing so, they discovered that an essential function for computing may be possible within a space so small that it's effectively one-dimensional.

Supercomputers Fire Lasers to Shoot Gamma Ray Beam

Supercomputers Fire Lasers to Shoot Gamma Ray Beam

A team of scientists at UT Austin used computer simulations to find a possible new source of gamma rays generated from tabletop lasers. Pictured in front of the Stampede supercomputer left to right: Alex Arefiev, research scientist, Institute for Fusion Studies and at the Center for High Energy Density Science, UT Austin; Toma Toncian, assistant director, Center for High Energy Density Science, UT Austin; David Stark, recently completed PhD, UT Austin (now at Los Alamos National Laboratory).

Ever play with a magnifying lens as a kid? Imagine a lens as big as the Earth. Now focus sunlight down to a pencil tip. That still wouldn't be good enough for what some Texas scientists have in mind. They want to make light even 500 times more intense. And they say it could open the door to the most powerful radiation in the universe: gamma rays.

Physics, Fracking, Fuel and the Future

Physics, Fracking, Fuel and the Future

​Physicists have a vital role to play in shaping the future of energy production and consumption, says Michael Marder, professor of Physics at the University of Texas at Austin, in the cover story of Physics Today​.

​Physicists Earn Career Research Awards from the Humboldt Foundation

​Physicists Earn Career Research Awards from the Humboldt Foundation

UT Austin physics professors Mike Downer and Philip J. Morrison each have garnered career research awards from the Humboldt Foundation to fund international research collaborations with German physicists.

Two College Alumni from 1980s Give Insights for New Grads

Two College Alumni from 1980s Give Insights for New Grads

This year's graduating seniors will hear words of wisdom from notable alumni who sat in their chairs about three decades ago.


Mr. Sandman: Alum Dan Goldman Snakes Across Dunes of Research

Mr. Sandman: Alum Dan Goldman Snakes Across Dunes of Research

Dan Goldman (Ph.D. Physics '02), a physicist at Georgia Tech, is exploring how animals move on tricky surfaces like sand, bark, leaves and grass. The New York Times produced two videos on his research, which revealed how sidewinder snakes climb up sand dunes and how the sandfish lizard "swims" through sand. Tomorrow, he's delivering a talk to undergraduates at UT Austin titled "Robophysics: Physics Meets Robotics." We recently chatted about his work.

Can Kilic Tackles Dark Matter, Particle Physics

Can Kilic Tackles Dark Matter, Particle Physics

​Dr. Can Kilic, an assistant professor and researcher in the Department of Physics at The University of Texas at Austin, specializes in theoretical particle physics, the Standard Model, and dark matter models. Dr. Kilic sat with the UT Physics newswriting team to discuss his research, his teaching, and his hopes for the future of science.