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From the College of Natural Sciences
Weddell Seals Hunting and Living Beneath Antarctic Ice

Weddell Seals Hunting and Living Beneath Antarctic Ice

A brief glimpse into the life of an Antarctic Weddell Seal with Ed Farrell.

Researcher Uses Aquatic Robots to Study Climate Change

Researcher Uses Aquatic Robots to Study Climate Change

Marine scientist Tracy Villareal has won a prize to use aquatic robots to study algal blooms and dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico. 

Scales Can Tell a Tarpon's Tale

Scales Can Tell a Tarpon's Tale

What are the benefits of being a tarpon fish with scales that can reach the size of a human palm? Scientists are able to tell what dark waters you’ve lived and traveled in by analyzing the scales chemically. 

Distinguished Marine Scientist to Lead UT Marine Science Institute

Distinguished Marine Scientist to Lead UT Marine Science Institute

Robert Dickey, a leader in areas of marine natural toxins, chemical contaminants and seafood safety, has been appointed the new director of The University of Texas at Austin’s Marine Science Institute (UTMSI) in Port Aransas, Texas.

Researchers Discover a New Way Fish Camouflage Themselves in the Ocean

Researchers Discover a New Way Fish Camouflage Themselves in the Ocean

Fish can hide in the open ocean by manipulating how light reflects off their skin, according to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin. The discovery could someday lead to the development of new camouflage materials for use in the ocean, and it overturns 40 years of conventional wisdom about fish camouflage.

Adapting to Life in the New Arctic

The arctic is a completely different place, says marine scientist.

Rock Snot Genomics

Rock Snot Genomics

University of Texas researchers use advanced sequencing and TACC's Ranger supercomputer to uncover origin of common algae.

Switching to a Power Stroke Enables a Tiny But Important Marine Crustacean to Survive

Switching to a Power Stroke Enables a Tiny But Important Marine Crustacean to Survive

Olympic swimmers aren’t the only ones who change their strokes to escape competitors. To escape from the jaws and claws of predators in cold, viscous water, marine copepods switch from a wave-like swimming stroke to big power strokes, a behavior that has now been revealed thanks to 3-D high-speed digital holography.

Video: The New Arctic

Video: The New Arctic

What will life look like, for humans and animals, as the Arctic ice cover diminishes?

Camp ANWR: Teaching Marine Science at the Top of the World

Camp ANWR: Teaching Marine Science at the Top of the World

Marine scientists Ken Dunton and Jim McClelland teach, and are taught, by the kids of Kaktovik, Alaska, deep inside the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.