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From the College of Natural Sciences
Trash on Our Beaches Started With Us, and It Must End with Us

Trash on Our Beaches Started With Us, and It Must End with Us

iStock photo of garbage can on beachWorld Ocean Day was celebrated this week and people across the planet talked about how to keep water bottles, micro-trash and other plastics out of our oceans.

Abundance Flourishes in Hanna Shoal

Abundance Flourishes in Hanna Shoal

Earlier this year, when President Barack Obama said a 1.3 million-acre marine area in Alaska would be off limits for future oil and gas drilling, it sparked the interest of a researcher who has worked in that region for nearly four decades.

Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems Intimately Tied to Climate

Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems Intimately Tied to Climate

Scientists have discovered that in the mid-1990s there was a large reorganization of the flora and fauna in the Gulf of Mexico linked to a shift in oceanic surface temperatures.

Consortium Awarded $9.2 Million for Gulf Oil Spill Research

Consortium Awarded $9.2 Million for Gulf Oil Spill Research

A University of Texas Marine Science Institute (UTMSI)-led consortium of seven institutions was awarded $9.2 million to continue research on the impact of oil spills and dispersants on the Gulf of Mexico and public health.  

Fish Eggs Turn Conventional View of Ocean Food Webs Upside Down

Fish Eggs Turn Conventional View of Ocean Food Webs Upside Down

Do you remember in fifth grade science class learning about food webs? Plants absorb energy from the sun, plants are eaten by animals, and smaller animals are eaten by bigger animals. Generally speaking, the flow is from smaller to larger organisms. An analysis by researchers at The University of Texas Marine Science Institute and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute reveals how the flow of nutrients in the ocean can also go in reverse, from larger animals to smaller ones. This new understanding has implications for conservation and fisheries management.

Changes in Coastal Upwelling Linked to Variability in Marine Ecosystem Off California

Changes in Coastal Upwelling Linked to Variability in Marine Ecosystem Off California

In findings of relevance to conservationists and the fishing industry, new research links short-term reductions in growth and reproduction of marine animals off the California coast to increasing variability in the strength of coastal upwelling currents — currents that supply nutrients to the region's diverse ecosystem.

Eel Genome Unlocks Mysteries of Electric Fish

Eel Genome Unlocks Mysteries of Electric Fish

Harold Zakon, professor of neuroscience and integrative biology, and his colleagues published new research demonstrating that the six electric fish lineages, all of which evolved independently, used essentially the same genes and developmental and cellular pathways to make an electricity-generating organ for defense, predation, navigation and ...
How Electric Fish Evolved Their Shocking Skills Independently at Six Different Times

How Electric Fish Evolved Their Shocking Skills Independently at Six Different Times

New research demonstrates that the six electric fish lineages, all of which evolved independently, used essentially the same genes and developmental and cellular pathways to make an electricity-generating organ for defense, predation, navigation and communication.

Rescuing Sea Turtles From the Cold

Rescuing Sea Turtles From the Cold

Plummeting temperatures in November and December left dozens of young green sea turtles out in the cold, quite literally.

Seahorse Heads Have a 'No Wake Zone' That’s Made for Catching Prey

Seahorse Heads Have a 'No Wake Zone' That’s Made for Catching Prey

Seahorses are slow, docile creatures, but their heads are perfectly shaped to sneak up and quickly snatch prey, according to marine scientists from The University of Texas at Austin.