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From the College of Natural Sciences
Mouth Bacteria Can Change Its Diet, Supercomputers Reveal

Mouth Bacteria Can Change Its Diet, Supercomputers Reveal

The following excerpt is from an article and podcast by Jorge Salazar, published August 12, 2014 on the TACC website:

Trapping a Bacterium in a Laser Beam Aids Study of Biofilms

Trapping a Bacterium in a Laser Beam Aids Study of Biofilms

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a technique to move and position a single bacterium using a highly focused laser. The precise control offered by this tool will allow researchers to better study how bacterial biofilms form.

Back with a Vengeance: The Trouble with Defeating Diseases

Back with a Vengeance: The Trouble with Defeating Diseases

Scanning electron micrograph showing Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells (false-colored green) confined within a bacterial "lobster" trap. This work by Marvin Whiteley and Jason Shear (click on image to read more) allows researchers to study how communities of bacteria interact and develop infections.

A common practice millions of Americans partake in to stay healthy is actually doing much more harm than good and may be contributing to the spread of drug-resistant disease.

Researchers Discover Possible New Target to Attack Flu Virus

Researchers Discover Possible New Target to Attack Flu Virus

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered that a protein produced by the influenza A virus helps it outwit one of our body's natural defense mechanisms. That makes the protein a potentially good target for antiviral drugs directed against the influenza A virus.

Possible Explanation for Human Diseases Caused by Defective Ribosomes

Possible Explanation for Human Diseases Caused by Defective Ribosomes

Ribosomes are essential for life, generating all of the proteins required for cells to grow. Mutations in some of the proteins that make ribosomes cause disorders characterized by bone marrow failure and anemia early in life, followed by elevated cancer risk in middle age. These disorders are generally called “ribosomopathies.”

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Mammalian Body Cells Lack Ancient Viral Defense Mechanism, Find UT Scientists

Mammalian Body Cells Lack Ancient Viral Defense Mechanism, Find UT Scientists

A team led by Chris Sullivan, a professor of molecular biosciences at The University of Texas at Austin, has provided the first positive evidence that RNA interference (RNAi), a biological process in which small RNA molecules prevent genes from being expressed, does not play a role as an antiviral in most body, or “somatic,” cells in mammals.

3-D Printed Microscopic Cages Confine Bacteria in Tiny Zoos for the Study of Infections

3-D Printed Microscopic Cages Confine Bacteria in Tiny Zoos for the Study of Infections

By caging bacteria in microscopic houses, scientists at The University of Texas at Austin are studying how communities of bacteria, such as those found in the human gut and lungs, interact and develop infections.

Understanding Why Chronic Wounds Don't Heal

Understanding Why Chronic Wounds Don't Heal

The problem with chronic wounds, and the solution, may lie in the war between two bacteria, says Marvin Whitely.

Dead Zebras in Electrified Cages Show How Anthrax Spreads in Wild

That's not just awesome words we strung together. It's real science.
Scientists Cage Dead Zebras in Africa to Understand the Spread of Anthrax

Scientists Cage Dead Zebras in Africa to Understand the Spread of Anthrax

Scavengers may not play as key a role in spreading anthrax disease through wildlife populations as previously assumed.