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From the College of Natural Sciences
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For the Holidays, Researchers Give Insights into Relationships and Dieting

For the Holidays, Researchers Give Insights into Relationships and Dieting

Star image taken from the Christmas Tree dress, part of the historic textile collection at UT's School of Human Ecology

Thinking about how to connect with distant friends and family? Searching for how to drop ten pounds in a week?

Research on Corporal Punishment Prompts Federal Letter Calling for Practice to End

Research on Corporal Punishment Prompts Federal Letter Calling for Practice to End

Image credit US Department of Education

This week—on November 22, 2016—U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. asked states to reconsider corporal punishment in public schools, noting that this form of discipline "is harmful, ineffective, and often disproportionately applied to students of color and students with disabilities."

Busting the Myth that Living with Your Parents is Harmful

Busting the Myth that Living with Your Parents is Harmful

Young adults who live with their parents find that their relationships feel more tense, with higher highs and lower lows. But they are no worse off as a result of these daily experiences than young adults living elsewhere, according to a new study from The University of Texas at Austin.

Children Adjust Poorly When Parents Cannot Handle Normal Misbehavior

Children Adjust Poorly When Parents Cannot Handle Normal Misbehavior

New research from The University of Texas at Austin shows that children adjust more poorly when parents react negatively in direct response to their child's crying, fussing and other aversive behavior than if the parent is negative in general. Children who routinely experience negative backlash from a parent are also less successful at navigating social situations.

Schools Use Corporal Punishment More on Some Children

Schools Use Corporal Punishment More on Some Children

In parts of the 19 states where the practice is still legal, corporal punishment in schools is used as much as 50 percent more frequently on children who are African American or who have disabilities, a new analysis of 160,000 cases during 2013-2014 has found. 

Risks of Harm from Spanking Confirmed by Analysis of Five Decades of Research

Risks of Harm from Spanking Confirmed by Analysis of Five Decades of Research

The more children are spanked, the more likely they are to defy their parents and to experience increased anti-social behavior, aggression, mental health problems and cognitive difficulties, according to a new meta-analysis of 50 years of research on spanking by experts at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Michigan.

Data About LGBT Students Could Help Address Harassment and Bullying

Data About LGBT Students Could Help Address Harassment and Bullying

​Collecting data about school discipline encounters involving LGBT students could help policymakers and educators create a safe learning environment for LGBT teens, suggests a new research brief co-authored by Stephen Russell, Professor of Human Development and Family Sciences at UT Austin, in collaboration with the Equity Project at Indiana University. 

Mixing Ages in Head Start Stunts Academic Progress

Mixing Ages in Head Start Stunts Academic Progress

Four-year-olds in the nation's largest preschool program fare worse with 3-year-olds in their classrooms, according to new research that shows a common practice in most Head Start programs may stunt children's learning.

Research Finds Men Intimidated by Smarts

Research Finds Men Intimidated by Smarts

​A study by Paul Eastwick, associate professor in the Department of Relationships and Family Sciences, was featured on ABC News and many other media organizations last week. This study found that men's response to intelligent women may not be what men themselves think it will be. 

Study Examines Seniors' Social Lives and Health

Study Examines Seniors' Social Lives and Health

The University of Texas at Austin will receive a $2.4 million grant over the next five years from the National Institute on Aging to study how social interactions improve the health of older adults. Participants will use wearable electronic devices and cellphone apps to monitor their physical activity and social interactions in real time for several days.