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From the College of Natural Sciences
UT Austin Mathematics, Family Sciences Programs Among Top 10 in World Rankings

UT Austin Mathematics, Family Sciences Programs Among Top 10 in World Rankings

The Center for World University Rankings (CWUR) has ranked the University Texas at Austin among the top 10 universities worldwide in three College of Natural Sciences subjects: Mathematics, Interdisciplinary Applications (#1), Mathematics, Applied (#5) and Family Studies (#7).

The Science of Relationships (Audio)

The Science of Relationships (Audio)

In honor of Valentine's Day, we're speaking with Lisa Neff, a researcher studying what makes happy, healthy romantic relationships tick. Neff is an associate professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. She answers several burning questions, including: What are the health benefits of romantic relationships? How can newlyweds avoid communication breakdowns that result from external stress? and, Do optimists make better partners?

Stephen T. Russell Named Fellow of National Council on Family Relations

Stephen T. Russell Named Fellow of National Council on Family Relations

The National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) has conferred its prestigious Fellow status on Stephen T. Russell, the Priscilla Pond Flawn Regents Professor in Child Development in and Chair of the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin.

A 90-Year Milestone at the Priscilla Pond Flawn Child and Family Laboratory

A 90-Year Milestone at the Priscilla Pond Flawn Child and Family Laboratory

Children at the original location of the UT Lab School, 1928

On this morning, newspaper headlines herald Ma Ferguson's last days in the Texas capitol, Charles Lindbergh's plans to bypass the Atlantic by air, and Charlie Chaplin's divorce and tax evasion woes.

Sowing Seeds for a Life of Research

Sowing Seeds for a Life of Research

Image credit: Vivian Abagiu

Migration—within and between countries—can have profound effects on children and their families. It was economic migration in rural China and the impact on children separated from their parents that first piqued Yang Hou's research interest. Now a UT Austin human development and family sciences graduate student, she is studying the effect of social context on families from the two largest immigrant populations in the US—Asians and Latinos.

For the Holidays, Researchers Give Insights into Relationships and Dieting

For the Holidays, Researchers Give Insights into Relationships and Dieting

Star image taken from the Christmas Tree dress, part of the historic textile collection at UT's School of Human Ecology

Thinking about how to connect with distant friends and family? Searching for how to drop ten pounds in a week?

Research on Corporal Punishment Prompts Federal Letter Calling for Practice to End

Research on Corporal Punishment Prompts Federal Letter Calling for Practice to End

Image credit US Department of Education

This week—on November 22, 2016—U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. asked states to reconsider corporal punishment in public schools, noting that this form of discipline "is harmful, ineffective, and often disproportionately applied to students of color and students with disabilities."

Busting the Myth that Living with Your Parents is Harmful

Busting the Myth that Living with Your Parents is Harmful

Young adults who live with their parents find that their relationships feel more tense, with higher highs and lower lows. But they are no worse off as a result of these daily experiences than young adults living elsewhere, according to a new study from The University of Texas at Austin.

Children Adjust Poorly When Parents Cannot Handle Normal Misbehavior

Children Adjust Poorly When Parents Cannot Handle Normal Misbehavior

New research from The University of Texas at Austin shows that children adjust more poorly when parents react negatively in direct response to their child's crying, fussing and other aversive behavior than if the parent is negative in general. Children who routinely experience negative backlash from a parent are also less successful at navigating social situations.

Schools Use Corporal Punishment More on Some Children

Schools Use Corporal Punishment More on Some Children

In parts of the 19 states where the practice is still legal, corporal punishment in schools is used as much as 50 percent more frequently on children who are African American or who have disabilities, a new analysis of 160,000 cases during 2013-2014 has found.