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From the College of Natural Sciences
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Discovery in Fish Might Point the Way to Cancer Treatment

Discovery in Fish Might Point the Way to Cancer Treatment

Peter ThomasPeter Thomas, professor of marine science, and researchers in his lab have made a discovery in fish that could provide a chink in the armor of cancer cells.

When Sperm Meets Egg, Zinc 'Fireworks' on Display

When Sperm Meets Egg, Zinc 'Fireworks' on Display

Sparks literally fly when a sperm and an egg hit it off. Chemists helped detect how the fertilized mammalian egg releases from its surface billions of zinc atoms in "zinc sparks," one wave after another.

Alcohol Abuse Linked to Newly Identified Gene Network

Alcohol Abuse Linked to Newly Identified Gene Network

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have identified a network of genes that appear to work together in determining alcohol dependence. The findings, which could lead to future treatments and therapies for alcoholics and possibly help doctors screen for alcoholism, are being published this week in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

Georgiou Named Inventor Of The Year By UT Austin

Georgiou Named Inventor Of The Year By UT Austin

The University of Texas at Austin has honored two scientists who have made important contributions to the medical field, George Georgiou and James McGinity, with its Inventor of the Year Award.

Compared with Apes, People’s Gut Bacteria Lack Diversity, Study Finds

Compared with Apes, People’s Gut Bacteria Lack Diversity, Study Finds

image.jpgThe microbes living in people’s guts are much less diverse than those in humans' closest relatives, the African apes, an apparently long evolutionary trend that appears to be speeding up in more modern societies, with possible implications for human health, according to a new study.

Silent Ebola Infections Could Be Key to Controlling Outbreak

Silent Ebola Infections Could Be Key to Controlling Outbreak

In a letter published in the Lancet medical journal on October 14, Steve Bellan and Lauren Ancel Meyers, speculate that Ebola may be silently immunizing large numbers of people who never fal ill or infect others. If so, they might bolster front-line health care responses to the ongoing outbreak. Learn more in our press release.

Cancer Awareness and the Role of Natural Sciences at UT

Cancer Awareness and the Role of Natural Sciences at UT

Bicycling many miles through the Texas Hill Country in support of one of the world’s most well-known cancer-fighting charitable organizations probably sounds like a great way to spend an October day, no matter who you are. Here at the College of Natural Sciences (CNS), members of our community have yet another reason to support LIVESTRONG, the nonp...
Mental Rest and Reflection Boost Learning, Study Suggests

Mental Rest and Reflection Boost Learning, Study Suggests

A new study, which may have implications for approaches to education, finds that brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they've learned before may boost later learning.

As Ebola Kills Some, It May Be Quietly Immunizing Others

As Ebola Kills Some, It May Be Quietly Immunizing Others

Ebola virus

As Ebola continues to spread in West Africa, it may be silently immunizing large numbers of people who never fall ill or infect others, yet become protected from future infection. If such immunity is confirmed, it would have significant ramifications on projections of how widespread the disease will be and could help determine strategies that health workers use to contain the disease, according to a letter published Tuesday in the Lancet medical journal.

The Math of the Ebola Outbreak

The Math of the Ebola Outbreak

Dr. Lauren Ancel Meyers, a professor in the Department of Integrative Biology, was interviewed by the Huffington Post Science editor David Freeman. Meyers, a pioneer in the mathematical modeling of infectious diseases, discusses Ebola and how outbreaks of infectious diseases are governed by complex mathematics.