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From the College of Natural Sciences
Females Can Place Limits on Evolution of Attractive Features in Males, Research Shows

Females Can Place Limits on Evolution of Attractive Features in Males, Research Shows

How melodious or handsome males become over evolutionary time can be limited by the cognitive abilities of females.
The Dangers of Cannibalism

The Dangers of Cannibalism

Biochemistry professor Andy Ellington blogs about cannibalism, prions, mad cow disease, and yet one more way in which civilization may be "hosed."
Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone Severely Impairs Reproduction In Atlantic Croaker, Researchers Find

Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone Severely Impairs Reproduction In Atlantic Croaker, Researchers Find

Study, the first of its kind looking at fish reproduction across the large hypoxic region off the coast of Louisiana, shows that croaker produce fewer eggs and sperm.
Sodium Channels Evolved Before Animals’ Nervous Systems, Research Shows

Sodium Channels Evolved Before Animals’ Nervous Systems, Research Shows

An essential component of animal nervous systems—sodium channels—evolved prior to the evolution of those systems, researchers from The University of Texas at Austin have discovered.

National Science Foundation Grant Helps Preserve and Digitize Fossil Collections

National Science Foundation Grant Helps Preserve and Digitize Fossil Collections

Fragile fossils as old as 55 million years will soon be protected, digitized and made accessible to researchers through $350,000 grant.

Epigenetics and Society

We are in the midst of a paradigm shift in our understanding of how evolution can act…on evolution, yielding mechanisms that allow both adaptation and heritability within the course of a lifetime. Such paradigm shifts almost always have societal consequences.

From Basic Science to the Fishing Line

Studying the basic science of redfish led to recovery of dwindling populations and better opportunities for Texas anglers.

In Poison Frogs, the More Toxic, the More Physically Fit

The most toxic, brightly colored members of the poison frog family may also be the best athletes, says a new study.

In the Race of Life, Better an Adaptable Tortoise than a Fit Hare

When it comes to survival of the fittest, it’s sometimes better to be an adaptable tortoise than a fitness-oriented hare, researchers say.

When Climate Change Isn't the Only Answer

Climate change might not be to blame for all cases of species - like pollinators and the flowers that depend on them - being out of sync.