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From the College of Natural Sciences
UT Austin Chemist Chosen to Receive Early Career Award

UT Austin Chemist Chosen to Receive Early Career Award

Livia Eberlin of The University of Texas at Austin is one of five leading female scientists chosen to receive a 2017 Marion Milligan Mason Award for Women in the Chemical Sciences from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Evolution Inspires Anthrax Cure (Audio)

Evolution Inspires Anthrax Cure (Audio)

This fall marks the 15th anniversary of the U.S. anthrax letter attacks that sickened dozens of people and killed five. At the time, there was no effective treatment for a late stage infection. The attacks accelerated work already underway at the University of Texas at Austin. Brent Iverson, George Georgiou and Jennifer Maynard borrowed a page from Mother Nature's playbook to develop the world's first treatment for late stage inhalation anthrax.

Chemists Garner New Insights into Protein Linked to Alzheimer’s Disease

Chemists Garner New Insights into Protein Linked to Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer's disease, the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, has proven especially thorny for researchers: no cure has been found, nor has there been any treatment proven to slow the progression of the disease once it sets in. In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, scientists have taken a back-to-the-beginning approach, examining what happens at the start of a chain reaction that occurs before onset of the disease.

A Peek Into the Minds of Award-Winning Educators

A Peek Into the Minds of Award-Winning Educators

The College of Natural Sciences is currently celebrating Discovery Education Week to promote and discuss science education throughout the college.

Low-Temp Production Could Mean Cheaper, Flexible Smart Windows

Low-Temp Production Could Mean Cheaper, Flexible Smart Windows

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have invented a new flexible smart window material that, when incorporated into windows, sunroofs, or even curved glass surfaces, will have the ability to control both heat and light from the sun. Their article about the new material will be published in the September issue of Nature Materials.

A darkened electrochromic film on plastic prepared by chemical condensation.
Making Virus Sensors Cheap and Simple: New Method Detects Single Viruses

Making Virus Sensors Cheap and Simple: New Method Detects Single Viruses

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a new method to rapidly detect a single virus in urine, as reported this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Chemistry Educator Receives Dads' Association Centennial Teaching Fellowship

Chemistry Educator Receives Dads' Association Centennial Teaching Fellowship

Fatima Fakhreddine of the College of Natural Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin has been chosen to hold an endowed Dads' Association Centennial Teaching Fellowship for 2016-2017. The fellowship recognizes excellence and commitment in the teaching of undergraduates.

UT Austin Ranks No. 25 Globally for Science in Latest Nature Index

UT Austin Ranks No. 25 Globally for Science in Latest Nature Index

The University of Texas at Austin ranked No. 25 in the world among academic institutions for publication of scientific research, according to the latest annual report from the Nature Index, and it ranked 7th among U.S. universities in chemistry. 

Drug Engineered at UT Austin to Treat Anthrax Gains FDA Approval

Drug Engineered at UT Austin to Treat Anthrax Gains FDA Approval

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin successfully culminated years of work when a drug they engineered for the treatment and prevention of inhalational anthrax — the anthrax antitoxin obiltoxaximab — received approval March 21 from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

New Catalyst Enables Cheaper Production of Hydrogen Fuel

New Catalyst Enables Cheaper Production of Hydrogen Fuel

Imagine a world where cars run on fuel derived from water instead of gasoline. Scientists at the University of Texas at Austin and elsewhere are developing methods for splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen that could someday power hydrogen fuel cells. One key challenge has been the high cost of catalysts, chemicals that shepherd the electrolytic reaction.