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From the College of Natural Sciences
Staying on the Grid: Placing a Nobel-prize Winning Neuroscience Discovery in a UT Austin Context

Staying on the Grid: Placing a Nobel-prize Winning Neuroscience Discovery in a UT Austin Context

Yesterday, three scientists were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discovery of two types of brain cells involved in keeping track of where we are when moving around. Called place cells and grid cells, they may hold the key to understanding aspects of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's. Laura Colgin, who did research with two of the prize-winning scientists awarded this year’s Nobel Prize, is now an associate professor of neuroscience in the University of Texas at Austin’s College of Natural Sciences who continues to investigate the role of place cells in spacial memory tasks and more.

Making Cancer Self-Destruct

Making Cancer Self-Destruct

Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions have created synthetic ion transporters that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct by ferrying sodium and chloride ions into the cancer cells, confirming a two-decades-old hypothesis that could point the way to new anticancer drugs while also benefitting patients with ...
Synthetic Molecule Makes Cancer Self-Destruct

Synthetic Molecule Makes Cancer Self-Destruct

SyntheticIonTransporters.jpgResearchers from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions have created a molecule that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct by ferrying sodium and chloride ions into the cancer cells.

These synthetic ion transporters, described this week in the journal Nature Chemistry, confirm a two-decades-old hypothesis that could point the way to new anticancer drugs while also benefitting patients with cystic fibrosis.

Researchers Discover Possible New Target to Attack Flu Virus

Researchers Discover Possible New Target to Attack Flu Virus

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered that a protein produced by the influenza A virus helps it outwit one of our body's natural defense mechanisms. That makes the protein a potentially good target for antiviral drugs directed against the influenza A virus.

Possible Explanation for Human Diseases Caused by Defective Ribosomes

Possible Explanation for Human Diseases Caused by Defective Ribosomes

Ribosomes are essential for life, generating all of the proteins required for cells to grow. Mutations in some of the proteins that make ribosomes cause disorders characterized by bone marrow failure and anemia early in life, followed by elevated cancer risk in middle age. These disorders are generally called “ribosomopathies.”

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You Are Your Microbiome

You Are Your Microbiome

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Have you ever felt not completely like yourself? You’re not alone. In fact, you’re never really alone. No matter how hard you may try, you’re always in the company of 100 trillion microbial friends.

The Origins of Evolutionary Innovation

The Origins of Evolutionary Innovation

Jeffrey Barrick uses TACC supercomputers to understand radical mutations and design artificial organisms.

Biologist Looks to New Horizons in Gene Research

Same gene mutation involved in both human deafness and a mustard plant growing sideways.

This Is What a Virus Infecting a Cell Looks Like

A video shows the first the first time scientists have observed a virus inserting its tail into a cell to infect it.
Virus Caught in the Act of Infecting a Cell

Virus Caught in the Act of Infecting a Cell

The detailed changes in the structure of a virus as it infects an E. coli bacterium have been observed for the first time.