Button to scroll to the top of the page.

News

From the College of Natural Sciences
This tag contain 1 private blog which isn't listed here.
The Emerging Revolution in Game Theory

The Emerging Revolution in Game Theory

The discovery of a winning strategy for Prisoner's Dilemma is forcing game theorists to rethink their discipline.

Professor Wins Media Award for Popular Website about Relationships

Professor Wins Media Award for Popular Website about Relationships

The Society for Personality and Social Psychology honors Tim Loving's efforts to communicate relationship science to the public.

Artificially Intelligent Game Bots Pass the Turing Test on Turing's Centenary

Artificially Intelligent Game Bots Pass the Turing Test on Turing's Centenary

BotPrize winners were scored as more human-like than half their human competitors.

Tracing Bevo: Graduate Student Studies Ancestry of Texas Longhorns

Tracing Bevo: Graduate Student Studies Ancestry of Texas Longhorns

Evolution, ecology and behavior grad student Emily McTavish faces off with a Texas Longhorn.
UT^2 Game Bot Judged More Human Than Human

UT^2 Game Bot Judged More Human Than Human

The UT^2 game bot has won the Humanlike Bot Competition at the IEEE World Congress on Computational Intelligence.
Research on Singing Mouse Seeks to Understand the Language Gene

Research on Singing Mouse Seeks to Understand the Language Gene

Steven Phelps studies singing mice to gain insights into the genes that contribute to the unique singing behavior—information that could help scientists understand and identify genes that affect language in humans.

Columbia Dispatch: Advice Can Save Vacation from Ruin

Russ Poldrack interviewed about the right and wrong way to vacation.
Tags:

Alcohol Abuse Might Be the Cause – Rather than the Effect – of Social Isolation and Poor Grades Among Teenagers, Study Shows

Human ecology professor finds that teenage drinkers are more likely to feel like social outcasts than the life of the party.

Vertebrates Share Ancient Neural Circuitry for Complex Social Behaviors, Biologists Find

Vertebrates Share Ancient Neural Circuitry for Complex Social Behaviors, Biologists Find

Humans, fish and frogs share neural circuits responsible for a diversity of social behavior, from flashy mating displays to aggression and monogamy, that have existed for more than 450 million years.

Testosterone: It's There for Dads When They Need It

Testosterone: It's There for Dads When They Need It

Some infant cues, such as baby cries, actually increase testosterone.

Tags: