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New Sculpture Unveiled at the Marine Science Institute

New Sculpture Unveiled at the Marine Science Institute

Ten-foot tall 'Interdependency' highlights the complex dependencies and interactions among various animals and plants in marine ecosystems.

interdependecy-flags.jpg"Interdependency," a bronze sculpture by Kent Ullberg, graces the front entrance of the University of Texas Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas, Texas.

PORT ARANSAS, Texas­ – The University of Texas Marine Science Institute unveiled a new sculpture on its campus in Port Aransas this past weekend.

The bronze sculpture, named “Interdependency,” highlights the complex dependencies and interactions among various animals and plants in marine ecosystems.

Designed by renowned sculptor Kent Ullberg, Interdependency is composed of 51 individuals of 48 species of marine life, from dolphin and swordfish to seastars and plankton, that fuse together to form a tarpon  more than eight feet in length.

“This is the most complex of any sculpture I’ve ever made,” said Ullberg at the unveiling ceremony. “It is my celebration of the interdependence of the marine system and is symbolic of the interdependence of all of nature.”

Ullberg is recognized as one of world's foremost wildlife sculptors, with installations across the world.

Interdependency was made possible through a generous donation from the Jack and Valerie Guenther Foundation of San Antonio, Texas.

The University of Texas Marine Science Institute (UTMSI) is the oldest and most significant marine research facility on the Texas coast dedicated to understanding the world's oceans and coasts and educating a global population dependent on the ocean ecosystem. Research focuses on marine ecosystems, fish biology, and marine chemistry. The institute is headquarters for the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve.

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Comments 1

 
Guest - Martin Arostegui on Wednesday, 27 November 2013 08:07

The future of our oceans and coastal fisheries depends on managing through an understanding of interrelationships in the marine environment. Ecosystem management represents the future. Congratulations to Kent and UTMSI for this important statement.

The future of our oceans and coastal fisheries depends on managing through an understanding of interrelationships in the marine environment. Ecosystem management represents the future. Congratulations to Kent and UTMSI for this important statement.
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Saturday, 23 September 2017

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