News

From the College of Natural Sciences
Controlling Most Atoms Now Possible

Controlling Most Atoms Now Possible

AUSTIN, Texas—Stopping and cooling most of the atoms of the periodic table is now possible using a pair of techniques developed by physicist Mark Raizen at The University of Texas at Austin. Raizen stopped atoms by passing a supersonic beam through an “atomic coilgun” and cooled them using “single-photon cooling.” The techniques are a major step ...

Liquid Bounce

Physics graduate student Matt Thrasher and Professor Harry Swinney recently explored the phenomenon of liquid bouncing, where a falling stream of liquid bounces off the surface of the same liquid. In the video, you will see a stream of silicone oil after it has dropped into a tank of the same oil. The long stream of oil stretches to the right und...
Atomic Coilgun Used to Slow and Stop Atoms

Atomic Coilgun Used to Slow and Stop Atoms

AUSTIN, Texas—An atomic coilgun that slows and stops atoms has been developed, report physicists from The University of Texas at Austin in the New Journal of Physics. Dr. Mark Raizen and his colleagues used the new coilgun to slow neon atoms, and Raizen said that the method could be used with a wide variety of atoms. “Our method will be applicabl...

Nanoparticle Technique Could Lead to Improved Semiconductors

AUSTIN, Texas—Devices made from plastic semiconductors, like solar cells and light-emitting diodes (LEDs), could be improved based on information gained using a new nanoparticle technique developed at The University of Texas at Austin. As electrical charges travel through plastic semiconductors, they can be trapped much like a marble rolling on a ...

Complex Flows of Turbulence Visualized

AUSTIN, Texas--The convoluted tangle describing turbulence has been visualized for the first time by a group of researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Their work, published in the April 6 issue of Physical Review Letters, may ultimately help engineers design more efficient planes, ca...

Physicists Slow and Control Supersonic Helium Beam

AUSTIN, Texas—The speed of a beam of helium atoms can be controlled and slowed using an “atomic paddle” much as a tennis player uses a racquet to control tennis balls, physicists at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered. The slow helium beam technique—a breakthrough in the field of atom optics—could someday be used to better probe micr...

Team of Theoretical Physicists Develop A Test for String Theory

AUSTIN, Texas—For decades, many scientists have criticized string theory, pointing out that it does not make predictions by which it can be tested. Now, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of California, San Diego and The University of Texas at Austin have developed a test of string theory. Their test, described in the Jan. 2...

New superlens reveals hidden nanostructures

AUSTIN, Texas—A microscope used to scan nanostructures can be dramatically enhanced by using a ‘superlens,’ reports an international team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute (MPI) of Biochemistry and The University of Texas at Austin in this week’s issue of Science. This is the first time a superlens, a lens capable of creating images of ob...
Finding about cellular microtubule rigidity could lead to development of new nano-materials

Finding about cellular microtubule rigidity could lead to development of new nano-materials

AUSTIN, Texas—Microtubules, essential structural elements in living cells, grow stiffer as they grow longer, an unexpected property that could lead to advances in nano-materials development, an international team of biophysicists has found. The team, from The University of Texas at Austin, the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidel...

MINOS experiment sheds light on mystery of neutrino disappearance

AUSTIN, Texas—Physicists from The University of Texas at Austin, as part of an international collaboration of scientists, observed the disappearance of neutrinos during a Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment, a finding that could help explain the role of these subatomic particles in the evolution of the universe. Sending a ...

New laser technique measures Brownian motion of a single particle

AUSTIN, Texas—Using a new technique to trap and measure single particles with lasers, an international group of researchers from Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland, The University of Texas at Austin and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, Germany, have demonstrated that Brownian motion of a single pa...