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From the College of Natural Sciences
New, Ultra-Flexible Probes Form Reliable, Scar-Free Integration with the Brain

New, Ultra-Flexible Probes Form Reliable, Scar-Free Integration with the Brain

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have designed ultra-flexible, nanoelectronic thread (NET) brain probes that can achieve more reliable long-term neural recording than existing probes and don't elicit scar formation when implanted. The researchers described their findings in a research article published on Feb. 15 in Science Advances.

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Breaking Up is Hard to Do

Breaking Up is Hard to Do

People with cystic fibrosis, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often develop serious and even life-threatening bacterial infections that are hard to treat, in large part because the bacteria form dense clusters called biofilms. Biofilms are resistant to the host's immune cells and to antibiotics.

Discoveries with Ties to UT Austin Rank Among Top Scientific Findings of the Year

Discoveries with Ties to UT Austin Rank Among Top Scientific Findings of the Year

Simulation of black holes colliding. Credit: SXS, the Simulating eXtreme Spacetimes

Two amazing scientific discoveries, both with ties to the College of Natural Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin, were named the top 2 science stories of 2016 by Discover Magazine. Other major media outlets also included them in their year-end "best of" lists, including National Geographic, Science News, Science and the New York Times. A third story from the College of Liberal Arts and Jackson School of Geosciences, which solved the mystery of how the most famous human ancestor died, appears in Discover's top ten as well.

Unusual Quantum Liquid Could Inspire Future Electronics

Unusual Quantum Liquid Could Inspire Future Electronics

For the first time, an experiment has directly imaged electron orbits in a high-magnetic field, illuminating an unusual collective behavior in electrons and suggesting new ways of manipulating the charged particles.

Two Physicists and an Engineer Elected Fellows of the American Physical Society

Two Physicists and an Engineer Elected Fellows of the American Physical Society

Three scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have been elected as fellows of the American Physical Society for their outstanding contributions and leadership in physics. The new fellows are: physicists Greg Fiete and Karol Lang, both in the College of Natural Sciences; and electrical engineer Emanuel Tutuc, in the Cockrell School of Engineering.

As Hunt for Sterile Neutrino Continues, Mystery Deepens

As Hunt for Sterile Neutrino Continues, Mystery Deepens

Physicists have hypothesized the existence of fundamental particles called sterile neutrinos for decades and a couple of experiments have even caught possible hints of them. However, according to new results from two major international consortia, the chances that these indications were right and that these particles actually exist are now much slimmer.

Distinguished Alum Discusses Gravitational Waves Discovery

Distinguished Alum Discusses Gravitational Waves Discovery

"We did it!" announced physics alumnus David Reitze to the world on February 11, 2016 – breaking the news of perhaps the biggest scientific discovery of our time.

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New Superconductor Could Pave Way to Practical Quantum Computers

New Superconductor Could Pave Way to Practical Quantum Computers

Scientists at the University of Texas at Austin have developed a new superconducting material that might allow the construction of quantum computers that are more resistant to outside noise, such as electromagnetic interference.

Super-resolution Microscope Builds 3D Images by Mapping Negative Space

Super-resolution Microscope Builds 3D Images by Mapping Negative Space

Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have demonstrated a method for making three-dimensional images of structures in biological material under natural conditions at a much higher resolution than other existing methods. The method may help shed light on how cells communicate with one another and provide important insights for engineers working to develop artificial organs such as skin or heart tissue.

Iran Releases Former UT Physicist

Iran Releases Former UT Physicist

​Iranian authorities released Omid Kokabee, former doctoral student in physics at The University of Texas at Austin, on Monday after more than five years of imprisonment according to reports by multiple outlets including the Associated Press.

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Scientists Glimpse Inner Workings of Atomically Thin Transistors

Scientists Glimpse Inner Workings of Atomically Thin Transistors

With an eye to the next generation of tech gadgetry, a team of physicists at The University of Texas at Austin has had the first-ever glimpse into what happens inside an atomically thin semiconductor device. In doing so, they discovered that an essential function for computing may be possible within a space so small that it's effectively one-dimensional.

Supercomputers Fire Lasers to Shoot Gamma Ray Beam

Supercomputers Fire Lasers to Shoot Gamma Ray Beam

A team of scientists at UT Austin used computer simulations to find a possible new source of gamma rays generated from tabletop lasers. Pictured in front of the Stampede supercomputer left to right: Alex Arefiev, research scientist, Institute for Fusion Studies and at the Center for High Energy Density Science, UT Austin; Toma Toncian, assistant director, Center for High Energy Density Science, UT Austin; David Stark, recently completed PhD, UT Austin (now at Los Alamos National Laboratory).

Ever play with a magnifying lens as a kid? Imagine a lens as big as the Earth. Now focus sunlight down to a pencil tip. That still wouldn't be good enough for what some Texas scientists have in mind. They want to make light even 500 times more intense. And they say it could open the door to the most powerful radiation in the universe: gamma rays.

​Physicists Earn Career Research Awards from the Humboldt Foundation

​Physicists Earn Career Research Awards from the Humboldt Foundation

UT Austin physics professors Mike Downer and Philip J. Morrison each have garnered career research awards from the Humboldt Foundation to fund international research collaborations with German physicists.

Mr. Sandman: Alum Dan Goldman Snakes Across Dunes of Research

Mr. Sandman: Alum Dan Goldman Snakes Across Dunes of Research

Dan Goldman (Ph.D. Physics '02), a physicist at Georgia Tech, is exploring how animals move on tricky surfaces like sand, bark, leaves and grass. The New York Times produced two videos on his research, which revealed how sidewinder snakes climb up sand dunes and how the sandfish lizard "swims" through sand. Tomorrow, he's delivering a talk to undergraduates at UT Austin titled "Robophysics: Physics Meets Robotics." We recently chatted about his work.

Talking Dark Matter, Particle Physics with Professor Can Kilic

Talking Dark Matter, Particle Physics with Professor Can Kilic

​Dr. Can Kilic, an assistant professor and researcher in the Department of Physics at The University of Texas at Austin, specializes in theoretical particle physics, the Standard Model, and dark matter models. Dr. Kilic sat with the UT Physics newswriting team to discuss his research, his teaching, and his hopes for the future of science.