News

From the College of Natural Sciences

Tagged for Destruction

The relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer has led biologist Jon Huibregtse on a journey deep into the regulatory structure of the human cell.

Office Hours: Dr. Dio Siegel

Chemist looks for potential drug compounds in plants.

Better Drugs to Fight Flu is Goal of $1.5 Million NIH Project

University of Texas at Austin and Rice University scientists have won a $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to scrutinize the influenza A virus for clues that could lead to more effective antiviral drugs.

Making smart materials

Jason Shear, Marvin Whiteley and others are developing "smart materials" in order to study antibiotic resistance, develop new medical devices and explore how 3-D hydrogels can help regrow nerve cells.

Undergraduate Wang Wins $20,000 Mitchell Prize

Yuxuan Wang, a senior majoring in biochemistry, has won the $20,000 grand prize in the 10th annual University Co-op George H. Mitchell Awards for Academic Excellence for undergraduate students at The University of Texas at Austin.

Synthesizing the Natural

Dionicio Siegel, assistant professor of chemistry, looks to nature for scientific inspiration. For Dionicio Siegel to synthesize compounds in the lab that may someday help treat neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, he has to rely on the work of a specialized class of people. Their job, essentially, is to go mucking around in the woods. “T...Dionicio Siegel, assistant professor of chemistry, looks to nature for scientific inspiration.

Oral Fixations

Graduate student Matthew Ramsey is working with Dr. Marvin Whiteley to better understand the complex ecologies of bacteria living in the human mouth. When microbiologist Marvin Whiteley and graduate student Matthew Ramsey began peering into the human mouth, as part of an ongoing quest to understand more about the ways that bacteria form complex ec...Graduate student Matthew Ramsey is working with Dr. Marvin Whiteley to better understand the complex ecologies of bacteria living in the human mouth.

Biologist Studies Evolution of HIV

AUSTIN, Texas--Dr. Sara Sawyer, an evolutionary biologist, will use a $120,000 grant from the Foundation for AIDS Research (amFAR) to study how the HIV virus and the cells it attacks have evolved together over time. The goal of her research is to discover new targets for drugs. When HIV infiltrates cells, the virus hijacks its host's genetic m...

The Bacteria Diet

How Pseudomonas proves so tenacious, and why it acts so differently in Cystic fibrosis-afflicted lungs than in normal human lungs, are puzzles that Whiteley has been working to solve for more than a decade.

Dudley Elected Fellow of American Academy of Microbiology

Dr. Jaquelin Dudley, professor of molecular genetics and microbiology, has been elected a fellow in the American Academy of Microbiology.
Why Hybrids Grow Bigger

Why Hybrids Grow Bigger

AUSTIN, Texas—Hybrid plants, like corn, grow bigger and better than their parents because many of their genes for photosynthesis and starch metabolism are more active during the day, report researchers from The University of Texas at Austin in a new study published in the journal Nature. Their research has relevance in many areas of agriculture, a...

Chemist Mahal Receives NIH New Innovator Award

AUSTIN, Texas—Dr. Lara K. Mahal, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry, is one of 31 researchers nationally to receive a 2008 New Innovator Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). She will use the 5-year, $1.5 million grant to decode how sugar molecules on cell surfaces encode information such as cell type and health. This m...
Discovery Opens Door For Drugs To Fight Bird Flu, Influenza Epidemics

Discovery Opens Door For Drugs To Fight Bird Flu, Influenza Epidemics

AUSTIN, Texas—Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Rutgers University have reported a discovery that could help scientists develop drugs to fight avian flu and other virulent strains of influenza. The researchers have determined the three-dimensional structure of a site on an influenza A virus protein that binds to one of the human...

Network Fever

Edward Marcotte is using networks—like those that could be used to illustrate the connections among users of the Web sites MySpace and Facebook—to study life itself.

Genes Evolve to Minimize Protein Production Errors

AUSTIN, Texas--Genetic evolution is strongly shaped by genes’ efforts to prevent or tolerate errors in the production of proteins, scientists at The University of Texas at Austin and Harvard University have found. Their study also suggests that the cost of errors in protein production may lie in the malformed proteins themselves, rather than in th...