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As classes start back for the spring semester, hundreds of first-year students are embarking on hands-on research projects as part of the Freshman Research Initiative (FRI). This year, FRI will celebrate its 10th anniversary. In honor of that milestone, we visit with some of the alumni of the FRI program, like Human Development and Family Sciences senior Elvira Marquez.

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Getting children who are overweight to regularly eat even just a helping or two of the right vegetables each day could improve their health in critical ways, a new study reports.

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The federal government needs to make breast cancer prevention a priority and place funding for prevention at the same level as other types of research, says a new sweeping report.

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Linda deGraffenried and her team of researchers are focused on helping the 15 percent of breast cancer patients and 10 percent of prostate cancer patients who are facing a dim prognosis.

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A research team in the Department of Nutritional Sciences has found that infant feeding patterns may increase the risk of a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or ALL.

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The Society for Personality and Social Psychology honors Tim Loving's efforts to communicate relationship science to the public.

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The team will then develop mathematical models to predict which chemical exposures have the potential to harm a pregnant woman or her developing infant.

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Human ecology professor finds that teenage drinkers are more likely to feel like social outcasts than the life of the party.

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Some infant cues, such as baby cries, actually increase testosterone.

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Maternal health epidemiologist Michele Forman explains how healthier habits during pregnancy can improve the lives of mother and child.

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A guide to when and how to eat organic, from the college's expert dietitians.

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Dr. Tim Loving responds to a question about whether it's a good idea for "Conflicted" to keep hanging out with her ex.

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Pesticides and pollutants are related to an alarming 450 percent increase in the risk of spina bifida and anencephaly in rural China.
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Human ecology professor Tim Loving blogs about maternal aggression.
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A number of heories attempt to explain why married women tend to do more housework than their husbands (note: none of them are called the “Men Are Lazy Theory”).