News

From the College of Natural Sciences
Novel Method Reveals Diet of Endangered Barton Springs Salamander

Novel Method Reveals Diet of Endangered Barton Springs Salamander

The Barton Springs Salamander (Eurycea sosorum) in Eliza Spring. Image courtesy of Hayley Gillespie. AUSTIN, Texas — Using a novel technique that is less invasive, less lethal, and more informative than traditional methods, an alumna of The University of Texas at Austin has identified what prey the endangered Barton Springs Salamander chooses to ea...
Biologist Camille Parmesan Named 2013 Distinguished Texas Scientist by Texas Academy of Science

Biologist Camille Parmesan Named 2013 Distinguished Texas Scientist by Texas Academy of Science

Parmesan receives honor for her work studying the impacts of climate change on wildlife.
Virus Caught in the Act of Infecting a Cell

Virus Caught in the Act of Infecting a Cell

The detailed changes in the structure of a virus as it infects an E. coli bacterium have been observed for the first time.

Bumblebees Do Best Where There Is Less Pavement and More Floral Diversity

Bumblebees Do Best Where There Is Less Pavement and More Floral Diversity

AUSTIN, Texas — Landscapes with large amounts of paved roads and impervious construction have lower numbers of ground-nesting bumblebees, which are important native pollinators, a study from The University of Texas at Austin and the University of California, Berkeley shows.

The Emerging Revolution in Game Theory

The Emerging Revolution in Game Theory

The discovery of a winning strategy for Prisoner's Dilemma is forcing game theorists to rethink their discipline.

Biologist Uses Supercomputer to Study Fast Evolving Geraniums

Biologist Uses Supercomputer to Study Fast Evolving Geraniums

With a grant from the NSF's Plant Genome Research Program, Bob Jansen is applying next-generation DNA sequencing methods to better understand why the geranium has evolved to be so radically different from other plants.

Tracing Bevo: Graduate Student Studies Ancestry of Texas Longhorns

Tracing Bevo: Graduate Student Studies Ancestry of Texas Longhorns

Evolution, ecology and behavior grad student Emily McTavish faces off with a Texas Longhorn.
Research on Singing Mouse Seeks to Understand the Language Gene

Research on Singing Mouse Seeks to Understand the Language Gene

Steven Phelps studies singing mice to gain insights into the genes that contribute to the unique singing behavior—information that could help scientists understand and identify genes that affect language in humans.

Biologist Receives $1.5 Million to Study Potential Biofuel Crops

Biologist Receives $1.5 Million to Study Potential Biofuel Crops

Tom Juenger has received a $1.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to study native prairie grasses as potential sources of biofuel.
Vertebrates Share Ancient Neural Circuitry for Complex Social Behaviors, Biologists Find

Vertebrates Share Ancient Neural Circuitry for Complex Social Behaviors, Biologists Find

Humans, fish and frogs share neural circuits responsible for a diversity of social behavior, from flashy mating displays to aggression and monogamy, that have existed for more than 450 million years.

Today's Environment Influences Behavior Generations Later

Descendants of exposed rats are more anxious, more sensitive to stress, and have greater activity in stress-related regions of the brain than descendants of unexposed rats.

Op-ed: Our Contaminated World

Op-ed: Our Contaminated World

Biologists David Crews and Andrea Gore argue that it's time for us to face the fact that our world is contaminated by chemicals, and we're contaminated as well.

Biologist Lawrence Gilbert Named 2012 Distinguished Texas Scientist by Texas Academy of Science

Biologist Lawrence Gilbert Named 2012 Distinguished Texas Scientist by Texas Academy of Science

Gilbert recognized for his lifetime of research on the co-evolution of insects and plants, population dynamics, chemical and behavioral ecology, and evolution of novel wing patterns in butterflies.

Damselflies and Their Technicolor Dream Coats

Damselflies and Their Technicolor Dream Coats

The Bio Musings video series covers the damselfly research of biology grad student Eben Gering.

Oil Exploration Would Endanger the Most Biodiverse Region in the Western Hemisphere, Say Scientists

Oil Exploration Would Endanger the Most Biodiverse Region in the Western Hemisphere, Say Scientists

An international team of scientists has found that Ecuador's Yasuní National Park, which sits on top of massive reserves of oil, is in the single most biodiverse region in the Western Hemisphere.