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From the College of Natural Sciences

Poison dart frog mimics gain when birds learn to stay away

AUSTIN, Texas—When predators learn to avoid a highly toxic frog, they generalize, and this allows a harmless frog to mimic and be more abundant than a frog whose poison packs less punch, biologists at The University of Texas at Austin studying poison dart frogs in the Amazon have discovered. Catherine Darst and Molly Cummings report their findings...

Convergent evolution of molecules in electric fish

AUSTIN, Texas—Having a set of extra genes gave fish on separate continents the ability to evolve electric organs, report researchers from The University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Harold Zakon and colleagues, in a paper recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that African and South American groups of fish independe...

Global warming's impact on U.S. plants, animals determined from review of dozens of studies

AUSTIN, Texas—Global warming has forced U.S. plants and animals to change their behavior in recent decades in ways that can be harmful, according to a new report prepared for the Pew Center on Global Climate Change. The Pew Center review of more than 40 studies is co-authored by Camille Parmesan, integrative biologist at The University of Texas at...

Strongest evidence of global warming provided in new research study

AUSTIN, Texas—A biologist at The University of Texas at Austin has teamed up with an economist to provide the strongest statistical evidence yet that global warming is affecting the natural world. Even when the pair considered habitat destruction or other possible underlying causes for behavior changes in plants, animals and other wildlife, the ana...

UT Austin researcher presents hot new evidence of global warming

AUSTIN, Texas—Ecologists from around the world are finding provocative signs that global warming already may be altering the Earth's flora and fauna. And they worry that next century, when the climate is expected to change more abruptly than it has in at least 10,000 years, plants and animals will be pushed to the limit. If the Earth heats up, wil...