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From the College of Natural Sciences

Scientists Find New Clues to Explain Amazonian Biodiversity

AUSTIN, Texas--Ice age climate change and ancient flooding—but not barriers created by rivers—may have promoted the evolution of new insect species in the Amazon region of South America, a new study suggests. The Amazon basin is home to the richest diversity of life on earth, yet the reasons why this came to be are not well understood. A team of ...
Global Warming Experts Recommend Drastic Measures to Save Species

Global Warming Experts Recommend Drastic Measures to Save Species

AUSTIN, Texas—An international team of conservation scientists from Australia, the United Kingdom and United States, including University of Texas at Austin Professor Camille Parmesan, calls for new conservation tactics, such as assisted migration, in the face of the growing threat of climate change. They report their policy ideas in a paper publi...

Into the Field

Ulrich Mueller, recent recipient of the E.O. Wilson award, crouches above a leafcutter ant mound at the Brackenridge Field Lab in Austin. He's been monitoring ants at the lab for a decade in concert with his work in Central and South America. Photo: Marsha Miller. In his acceptance speech for the E.O. Wilson Award at this year’s annual meeting o...Ulrich Mueller at Brackenridge Field Lab
Giant Cane and the Little Wasp That Could

Giant Cane and the Little Wasp That Could

AUSTIN, Texas—Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin will work with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) to investigate biological control for an invasive cane grass that is choking waterways across North America. The introduced European cane, Arundo donax, grows in dense stands in wetlands and rip...

Kirkpatrick Elected to AAAS

AUSTIN, Texas--Two faculty members at The University of Texas at Austin have been elected fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. They are Dr. J. Tinsley Oden, an associate vice president for research and director of the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), and Dr. Mark Kirkpatrick, a professor in the Secti...

Globetrotting: Kristina Schegel

I’m standing on Pipeline, a muddy, puddle-filled road that runs through Soberania National Park in Panama. Dr. Mike Ryan, doctoral student Rachel Page, post doc Kim Hoke, and I came to the road to look for the “foam nests” of túngara frogs. Male túngaras whip-up the meringue-like nests, which hold eggs deposited by their mates, through the eggbeate...schlegel_post

Tree of Life Grows in Seay

Rendering of the Tree of Life installation in the Seay Building. In addition to giving money to the Phyllis L. Richards Endowed Professorship in Child Development, which will support a professor in the Human Development and Family Sciences program, Mr. and Mrs. Dick Rathgeber wanted to give a gift that would inspire further giving. So in colla...Rendering of the Tree of Life installation in the Seay Building.
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Cool Class: Lizard Island

Sure, communal living on a distant island might bring to mind a certain hit television show. But the 15 students who stayed on Lizard Island this past summer were satisfied to find their intrigue in the incredible coral reefs they snorkeled through each day. For three summers Dr. Mary Poteet, research fellow and lecturer in integrative biology, ha...lizard-island

Research Makes Discover's Top 100

Research conducted by University of Texas at Austin professors Andrea Gore and David Crews has been included on Discover magazine’s list of the “Top 100 Science Stories of 2007.” Gore is a professor of pharmacology and toxicology in the College of Pharmacy, and Crews is the Ashbel Smith Professor of Integrative Biology in the College of Natural Sc...

When She's Turned On, Some Of Her Genes Turn Off

AUSTIN, Texas—When a female is attracted to a male, entire suites of genes in her brain turn on and off, show biologists from The University of Texas at Austin studying swordtail fish. Molly Cummings and Hans Hofmann found that some genes were turned on when females found a male attractive, but a larger number of genes were turned off. “When fema...
Tree of Life Revealed for Flowering Plants

Tree of Life Revealed for Flowering Plants

AUSTIN, Texas—The evolutionary Tree of Life for flowering plants has been revealed using the largest collection of genomic data of these plants to date, report scientists from The University of Texas at Austin and University of Florida. The scientists, publishing two papers in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week online, found...

Invasive Plants Are Moving Targets

Left top: Healthy Senecio vulgaris growing in Calif. where it was introduced approximately 100 yrs ago. Left bottom: Dying Senecio vulgaris covered in Puccinia and Albugo pathogens, growing in part of its native range in the UK (from Calif. seed). Center top: Senecio squalidus growing in the UK where it invaded nearly 400 years ago, with some Pucci...

Biology Professor Camille Parmesan Honored for Conservation Leadership

AUSTIN, Texas — The nation's leading conservation education and advocacy group has honored Dr. Camille Parmesan, associate professor of integrative biology at The University of Texas at Austin, with its National Conservation Achievement Award for exemplary leadership in protecting the environment and natural resources. Parmesan was selected for her...

Biologist Parmesan Honored For Conservation Leadership

AUSTIN, Texas—The nation’s leading conservation education and advocacy group is honoring Dr. Camille Parmesan, associate professor of integrative biology at The University of Texas at Austin with its National Conservation Achievement Award for exemplary leadership in protecting the environment and natural resources. Parmesan was selected for her ...

Defiance May Be Part of Healthy Child Development

At very young ages, children’s defiant behavior toward their mothers may not be a bad thing. This defiance may in fact reflect children’s emerging autonomy and a confidence that they can control events that are important to them. Those are the findings of a new study conducted by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University ...