News

From the College of Natural Sciences

Posts highlighting some of the many articles mentioning College of Natural Sciences faculty and students in the media.

The Math of the Ebola Outbreak

The Math of the Ebola Outbreak

Dr. Lauren Ancel Meyers, a professor in the Department of Integrative Biology, was interviewed by the Huffington Post Science editor David Freeman. Meyers, a pioneer in the mathematical modeling of infectious diseases, discusses Ebola and how outbreaks of infectious diseases are governed by complex mathematics.

Is Corporal Punishment Abuse?

Is Corporal Punishment Abuse?

Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson was recently indicted on charges of child abuse for hitting his son with a tree branch. Elizabeth Gershoff, a professor of human development and family sciences in the School of Human Ecology who has studied corporal punishment for 15 years, was interviewed -- and her research referenced -- extensively in the media to provide context for the Peterson story from September 16 to 25.

Scientists Develop Ebola Vaccine

Scientists Develop Ebola Vaccine

Since 2007, Maria Croyle and her colleageus have been developing a vaccine for the Ebola virus. The oral vaccine has been shown effective in rodents and primates and may soon be ready for human clinical trials. Croyle is a professor in the College of Pharmacy and member of the College of Natural Sciences' Center for Infectious Disease and Inst...
Making Cancer Self-Destruct

Making Cancer Self-Destruct

Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions have created synthetic ion transporters that can cause cancer cells to self-destruct by ferrying sodium and chloride ions into the cancer cells, confirming a two-decades-old hypothesis that could point the way to new anticancer drugs while also benefitting patients with ...
Aspirin May Help Overweight Breast Cancer Patients

Aspirin May Help Overweight Breast Cancer Patients

Linda deGraffenried, a cancer researcher in The University of Texas at Austin's School of Human Ecology, and her colleageus have determined that postmenopausal overweight or obese breast cancer patients receiving hormone therapy as part of their treatment and who use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin or ibuprofen ha...
Mars-Venus Effect on Gut Microbes

Mars-Venus Effect on Gut Microbes

Daniel Bolnick, professor of integrative biology, and his colleagues have shown that men and women's gut microbes are different, even when they eat the same diet. Several outlets reported on the findings on July 30: The Calcutta Telegraph: http://www.telegraphindia.com/1140730/jsp/nation/story_18667828.jsp Medical Daily: http://www.medicaldaily.co...
Eel Genome Unlocks Mysteries of Electric Fish

Eel Genome Unlocks Mysteries of Electric Fish

Harold Zakon, professor of neuroscience and integrative biology, and his colleagues published new research demonstrating that the six electric fish lineages, all of which evolved independently, used essentially the same genes and developmental and cellular pathways to make an electricity-generating organ for defense, predation, navigation and ...
Sober Worms In The News

Sober Worms In The News

Apparently the media love the idea of worms that can't get drunk. The work by Scott Davis, Luisa Scott, Kevin Hu, and Jon Pierce-Shimomura, that was recently published in the The Journal of Neuroscience, has gone viral and is appearing all over the web. The worms were created using a mutation found by Scott Davis. You can read the original press re...
Op Ed: Self-driving cars are right around the corner; then what?

Op Ed: Self-driving cars are right around the corner; then what?

In an op-ed in the Austin American-Statesman, professor Peter Stone states "When it comes to autonomous cars, the question is no longer 'If?' but 'When?'" He goes on to ponder the many unknowns as self-driving cars go from science fiction to commonplace in the very near future: Certain technologies go from being almost unimaginable to becoming co...
Backstage Pass to the Texas Pettawatt Laser

Backstage Pass to the Texas Pettawatt Laser

Science writer and UT Austin alumnus Joe Hanson (Ph.D. '13) takes us on a tour of the Texas Center for High Intensity Laser Science, home of the Texas Pettawatt Laser. Photos by Robert Schults evoke the awe and mystery of this fundamental research. Read the article in the July/August 2014 edition of the Alcalde: 1,000,000,000,000,000 Wat...
Novel Method for Isotope Enrichment

Novel Method for Isotope Enrichment

Mark Raizen and his colleagues have developed a new method for enriching stable isotopes, a group of the world’s most expensive chemical commodities which are vital to medical imaging and nuclear power. The work has attracted some attention from the science and medical world.

Turtles Go On Summer Vacation While Ponds Get Scrubbed Clean

Turtles Go On Summer Vacation While Ponds Get Scrubbed Clean

On June 9, 2014, UT biologists and students helped move about 140 turtles from UT Austin's beloved turtle pond to a temporary home for a long overdue cleaning of the lower pond.

Brain Control in a Flash of Light

Brain Control in a Flash of Light

One of the most exciting new tools to be developed in neuroscience in the past decade is called optogenetics. It allows researchers to turn individual neurons in the brain of a living human subject off and on without surgery or other invasive procedures. Researchers around the world are now using it in the hopes of unlocking countless mysteries of ...
How do you move 100,000 bees from Connecticut to Texas in August?

How do you move 100,000 bees from Connecticut to Texas in August?

Nancy Moran and her students moved 100,000 bees from Connecticut to Texas in a minivan ... in August. To keep the bees from overheating, they kept the AC cranked to the max during the day and left the windows down at night. "It seemed unlikely that anyone would try to steal something from a van full of bees," says Moran. As part of the Behind the ...
The Horn: Junk Food, Good Science

The Horn: Junk Food, Good Science

Think you’ll always pick chocolate over a bag of chips? Don’t be so sure. Researchers have found that if they can get people to pay more attention to a particular type of junk food, they will begin to prefer it—even weeks or months after the experiment. The finding suggests a new way to manipulate our decisions and perhaps even encourage us to pick...