News

From the College of Natural Sciences

Posts highlighting some of the many articles mentioning College of Natural Sciences faculty and students in the media.

How Longhorns Got Their Long Horns

How Longhorns Got Their Long Horns

Evolutionary biologist David Hillis, a professor in the Department of Integrative Biology, is featured in an in-depth Q-and-A piece in the New York Times

Trash on Our Beaches Started With Us, and It Must End with Us

Trash on Our Beaches Started With Us, and It Must End with Us

iStock photo of garbage can on beachWorld Ocean Day was celebrated this week and people across the planet talked about how to keep water bottles, micro-trash and other plastics out of our oceans.

Thriving in Our Digital World

Thriving in Our Digital World
Calvin Lin The College Board and the National Science Foundation (NSF) recently announced they will expand their initiative to improve access to computer science education in high schools. Computer science skills are increasingly critical in the world today and the program is designed to strengthen these skills among students, especially gir...

Lester Reed Retrospective: A 'complex' man who loved science

Lester Reed Retrospective: A 'complex' man who loved science
The Department of Molecular Biosciences' Marvin Hackert, Dean Appling, and Alan Lambowitz have written a touching tribute to Lester J. Reed in PNAS Early Edition. Reed, who was a pioneer in the field of biochemistry and a vital member of the faculty of The University of Texas at Austin for over 50 years, passed away on January 14, 2015.

Unlocking the Mystery of How Memories Are Made

Unlocking the Mystery of How Memories Are Made
A team of neuroscientists at the University of Texas at Austin have won a $150,000 grant from the Brain Research Foundation to visualize synapses in the brain as memories are being created. The team consists of professor Kristen Harris, assistant professor Boris Zemelman, and research associate Masaaki Kuwajima. All three are members of the Center...

Steven Weinberg's "To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science"

Steven Weinberg's
Astronomy and Physics professor Steven Weinberg has penned a new book that looks at the development of science and scientific discovery throughout history. Below we present you with a few of the reviews of this new work: Austin American-Statesman Financial Times Kirkus Reviews National Geographic Nature The Telegraph Times Higher Educatio...

Artifical Intelligence Researcher Predicts the Acceptance of Self-Driving Cars

Artifical Intelligence Researcher Predicts the Acceptance of Self-Driving Cars

The Dallas Observer recently asked scientists around the state to predict what the world might look like 15 years from now. Artificial intelligence researcher Peter Stone talks about the surprisingly fast acceptance of autonomous cars and how dramatically he thinks they will change our lives. Stone also predicts big advances in the application of robots in health and medicine.

Ebola Expert Speaks on Efforts to Fight Epidemic

Ebola Expert Speaks on Efforts to Fight Epidemic

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, delivered his talk "The Ebola Outbreak: The Perfect Storm" at The University of Texas at Austin on Monday, February 9. Watch video from the event at Time Warner Cable News.

UT Austin at National Artificial Intelligence Conference

UT Austin at National Artificial Intelligence Conference

Hundreds of students and researchers from around the world arrived in Austin January 25-30 for a national conference on artificial intelligence. The conference for the Association for Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, or AAAI, featured various guest speakers, presenting researchers, demonstrations and games. For more, read our feature story on AI.

Leaping Lizards: Scientists Catch Evolution in Action

Leaping Lizards: Scientists Catch Evolution in Action

Thanks to an invasive lizard from Cuba, scientists have documented green anoles rapidly evolving better gripping feet. Yoel Stuart was lead author on the study appearing in the journal Science. For more, read our press release or check out these reports in the media from Oct. 23-24:

Learning May be Improved by Mental Rest and Reflection

Learning May be Improved by Mental Rest and Reflection

According to a new study by Margaret Schlichting and Alison Preston, which may have implications for approaches to education, brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they've learned before may boost later learning.

Silent Ebola Infections Could Be Key to Controlling Outbreak

Silent Ebola Infections Could Be Key to Controlling Outbreak

In a letter published in the Lancet medical journal on October 14, Steve Bellan and Lauren Ancel Meyers, speculate that Ebola may be silently immunizing large numbers of people who never fal ill or infect others. If so, they might bolster front-line health care responses to the ongoing outbreak. Learn more in our press release.

How 'Green' is Your Coffee?

How 'Green' is Your Coffee?

With more and more eco-friendly coffee on grocery store shelves in the U.S. and with major outlets like Starbucks and McDonald's getting into the act in recent years, you might think the coffee industry is becoming greener. But think again. 

The Math of the Ebola Outbreak

The Math of the Ebola Outbreak

Dr. Lauren Ancel Meyers, a professor in the Department of Integrative Biology, was interviewed by the Huffington Post Science editor David Freeman. Meyers, a pioneer in the mathematical modeling of infectious diseases, discusses Ebola and how outbreaks of infectious diseases are governed by complex mathematics.

Is Corporal Punishment Abuse?

Is Corporal Punishment Abuse?

Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson was recently indicted on charges of child abuse for hitting his son with a tree branch. Elizabeth Gershoff, a professor of human development and family sciences in the School of Human Ecology who has studied corporal punishment for 15 years, was interviewed -- and her research referenced -- extensively in the media to provide context for the Peterson story from September 16 to 25.