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From the College of Natural Sciences
Computer Scientist Earns Prestigious ACM Award for Encryption Achievement

Computer Scientist Earns Prestigious ACM Award for Encryption Achievement

Brent Waters of The University of Texas at Austin has been selected to receive the Grace Murray Hopper Award from the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). This award recognizes the outstanding young computer professional of the year for a recent major technical or service contribution that was made at 35 years of age or less.

A.I. Expert Weighs in on Historic Computer vs. Human Contest

A.I. Expert Weighs in on Historic Computer vs. Human Contest

First the robots successfully challenged the chess masters, then the Jeopardy champions. Now comes a match-up for a new generation.

Computer Science Undergrad Gives Back in Big Way

Computer Science Undergrad Gives Back in Big Way

Nicholas Cobb, a second-year computer science student, has won national recognition repeatedly for his work with a charitable organization he started at the age of 12. Most recently, he traveled to New York for recognition at the 2015 Nickelodeon HALO Awards.

Nomadic Computing Speeds Up Big Data Analytics

Nomadic Computing Speeds Up Big Data Analytics

How do Netflix or Facebook know which movies you might like or who you might want to be friends with?

Here's a hint: It starts with a few trillion data points and involves some complicated math and a lot of smart computer programming.

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College Welcomes New Faculty in New Academic Year

College Welcomes New Faculty in New Academic Year

The College of Natural Sciences welcomes 11 new faculty this fall. Whether searching for evidence of exotic new physics, enabling the creation of personal robots, or addressing critical problems in cancer research, these industrious and innovative faculty members build on the college's reputation for pioneering research and research-based teaching.

Computer Scientists Find Mass Extinctions Can Accelerate Evolution

Computer Scientists Find Mass Extinctions Can Accelerate Evolution

At the start of the simulation, a biped robot controlled by a computationally evolved brain stands upright on a 16 meter by 16 meter surface. The simulation proceeds until the robot falls or until 15 seconds have elapsed. Image credit: Joel Lehman.

A computer science team at The University of Texas at Austin has found that robots evolve more quickly and efficiently after a virtual mass extinction modeled after real-life disasters such as the one that killed off the dinosaurs. Beyond its implications for artificial intelligence, the research supports the idea that mass extinctions actually speed up evolution by unleashing new creativity in adaptations.

UT Austin Villa Wins RoboCup 2015

UT Austin Villa Wins RoboCup 2015

The Austin Villa Robot Soccer Team participated in two competitions in the RoboCup 2015 competition in Hefei, China: the Standard Platform League (SPL) and the 3D simulation league.

Researchers Tackle the Dark Side of Moore's Law

Researchers Tackle the Dark Side of Moore's Law

This month marks the 50th Anniversary of Moore's Law, an observation that every couple of years, computer chip manufacturers manage to squeeze twice as many transistors onto a computer chip. Because transistors are the tiny on-off switches that perform calculations and temporarily store information, Moore’s Law also embodies the exponential increase in raw computing power that has unleashed a blizzard of tech innovations.

Computer Scientist Wins Sloan Fellowship

Computer Scientist Wins Sloan Fellowship

A faculty member at the University of Texas at Austin who works to improve the security and reliability of computer software systems has been awarded a Sloan Research Fellowship for 2015.

Intelligence, Designed: The Future of AI

Intelligence, Designed: The Future of AI

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In the artificial intelligence age we live in, you’ll find AI in the workplace, the home, and even on a sports pitch. From hospitals to highways, artificial intelligence offers new solutions to real-world problems.

Texas Students Win IBM Watson Competition With App Expanding Access to Social Services

Texas Students Win IBM Watson Competition With App Expanding Access to Social Services

Students from The University of Texas at Austin won $100,000 in seed funding for developing an idea for a smart phone app that would use artificial intelligence to help Texas residents get information about health care, food assistance and other social services in partnership with the United Way for Greater Austin’s 2-1-1 Navigation Center.

Computer Scientists at UT Austin Crack Code for Redrawing Bird Family Tree

Computer Scientists at UT Austin Crack Code for Redrawing Bird Family Tree

A new computational technique developed at The University of Texas at Austin has enabled an international consortium to produce an avian tree of life that points to the origins of various bird species. A graduate student at the university is a leading author on papers describing the new technique and sharing the consortium’s findings about bird evolution in the journal Science.

New Statistical Method Helps Reveal Timing of Key Events in Plant Evolution

New Statistical Method Helps Reveal Timing of Key Events in Plant Evolution

543_Micrasterias_thomasiana.jpgUsing a host of methodologies, including a new statistical method developed at The University of Texas at Austin, an international collaboration of researchers have completed a large-scale DNA study that reveals important details about key transitions in the evolution of plant life on our planet.

UT Austin Computer Science Program Ranked Sixth in the World

UT Austin Computer Science Program Ranked Sixth in the World

GatesBldg.jpgThe University of Texas of Austin's computer science program is the 6th best in the world, according to the 2014 Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) compiled by the Center for World-Class Universities at Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

UT Austin Villa Team Make Two Wins in 2014 RoboCup

UT Austin Villa Team Make Two Wins in 2014 RoboCup

Congratulations to professor Peter Stone and his students for impressive wins in the RoboCup 2014 competition in Joao Pessoa, Brazil, including 1st place in the 3D simulation league and 1st place in the technical challenge competition.  Pictured l to r: Patrick MacAlpine, Mike Depinet, Peter Stone and Katie Genter. After ...