News

From the College of Natural Sciences
3-D Printed Microscopic Cages Confine Bacteria in Tiny Zoos for the Study of Infections

3-D Printed Microscopic Cages Confine Bacteria in Tiny Zoos for the Study of Infections

By caging bacteria in microscopic houses, scientists at The University of Texas at Austin are studying how communities of bacteria, such as those found in the human gut and lungs, interact and develop infections.

Chemistry Department Aims to Improve Diversity with $2.7 Million Grant

Chemistry Department Aims to Improve Diversity with $2.7 Million Grant

The Department of Chemistry in the College of Natural Sciences has received two grants, totaling more than $2.5 million, to help recruit, retain and support graduate and post-doctoral students from groups that are under-represented in the sciences. 

Chemical Reaction Could Streamline Manufacture of Pharmaceuticals and Other Compounds

Chemical Reaction Could Streamline Manufacture of Pharmaceuticals and Other Compounds

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered a new chemical reaction that has the potential to lower the cost and streamline the manufacture of compounds ranging from agricultural chemicals to pharmaceutical drugs.

Chemists Work to Desalt the Ocean for Drinking Water, One Nanoliter at a Time

Chemists Work to Desalt the Ocean for Drinking Water, One Nanoliter at a Time

By creating a small electrical field that removes salts from seawater, chemists at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Marburg in Germany have introduced a new method for the desalination of seawater that consumes less energy and is dramatically simpler than conventional techniques. The new method requires so little energy that it can run on a store-bought battery.

Chemist Fights a Very Personal War on Cancer

Chemist Fights a Very Personal War on Cancer

Chemist Jonathan Sessler, a cancer survivor, joins with a colleague from MD Anderson to develop a better drug for ovarian cancer.
C. Grant Willson Wins Japan Prize

C. Grant Willson Wins Japan Prize

Chemist is recognized for development of a process that is now used to manufacture nearly all of the microprocessors and memory chips in the world.
Chemist Al Bard Receives National Medal of Science

Chemist Al Bard Receives National Medal of Science

Bard is one of 12 eminent researchers who will receive the award at a ceremony in early 2013, announced President Obama on December 21, 2012.

Tags:
Chemists Synthesize a New Breed of Anti-Aromatic Compounds

Chemists Synthesize a New Breed of Anti-Aromatic Compounds

The novel compounds can toggle between three states, which is a scientific first.
Chemist Named Inventor of the Year by UT Austin

Chemist Named Inventor of the Year by UT Austin

C. Grant Willson invented a nanolithography process used for manufacturing computer chips, hard drives and other electronic components.
Wine Swindle Benefits a Chemistry Professor and his Undergraduate Corps of Wine Detectives

Wine Swindle Benefits a Chemistry Professor and his Undergraduate Corps of Wine Detectives

A crime in France and a class action suit in the U.S. leads to Professor Eric Anslyn receiving funding to support student research on the chemistry of wine.
Computer Memory Could Increase Fivefold From Chemist's Research

Computer Memory Could Increase Fivefold From Chemist's Research

In a paper in Science, C. Grant Willson and colleagues report on processes they are developing that could increase storage capacity by a factor of five.
The oPAD

The oPAD

In this video we take an NPR-style look at the origami Paper Analytical Device.

Origami-Inspired Paper Sensor Could Test for Malaria and HIV for Less than 10 Cents

Origami-Inspired Paper Sensor Could Test for Malaria and HIV for Less than 10 Cents

Inspired by the paper-folding art of origami, chemists at have developed a 3-D paper sensor that may be able to test for diseases such as malaria and HIV.

University of Texas Chemist Receives Major Grant to Improve Detection of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

University of Texas Chemist Receives Major Grant to Improve Detection of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

Simple, paper-based test for drug-resistant TB is the goal of chemist Andy Ellington, whose project received a $1.6 million grant through Grand Challenges in Global Health.

Discovery of a ‘Dark State’ Could Mean a Brighter Future for Solar Energy

Discovery of a ‘Dark State’ Could Mean a Brighter Future for Solar Energy

The efficiency of conventional solar cells could be increased from 31 to 44 percent, according to new research on the mechanisms of solar energy conversion led by chemist Xiaoyang Zhu.