Button to scroll to the top of the page.

Updates

News

From the College of Natural Sciences
There's a Sky Above the Sky: Astronaut Scholar Teddy Hsieh Takes Aim

There's a Sky Above the Sky: Astronaut Scholar Teddy Hsieh Takes Aim

Photo credit Cathy Le.

CNS Career Services advises students to keep resumés to one page, but Teddy Hsieh deserves two.

Eric Anslyn Receives Royal Society of Chemistry’s Centenary Prize

Eric Anslyn Receives Royal Society of Chemistry’s Centenary Prize

University of Texas at Austin chemistry professor Eric Anslyn received the Royal Society of Chemistry's 2020 Centenary Prize.

Cancer Drug with Better Staying Power and Reduced Toxicity Shows Preclinical Promise

Cancer Drug with Better Staying Power and Reduced Toxicity Shows Preclinical Promise

The drug candidate, called OxaliTEX, is made of two parts: a star-shaped molecule (blue) called texaphyrin that acts like a kind of delivery truck and a modified version of a platinum drug (red) that acts like a toxic package for cancer cells. Illustration credit: iQ Group Global.

​A drug candidate has been found in preclinical trials to stop tumor growth entirely, deliver more cancer-busting power than many commonly used chemotherapy drugs and do so with fewer toxic side effects and more ability to overcome resistance.

Two UT Austin Faculty Receive Sloan Research Fellowships

Two UT Austin Faculty Receive Sloan Research Fellowships

Sean Roberts (left) and David Soloveichik have received Sloan Research Fellowships.

Two faculty members from the University of Texas at Austin have received 2020 Sloan Research Fellowships, which honor outstanding early-career scientists in eight fields.

Chemist Carlos Baiz Named a 2020 Cottrell Scholar

Chemist Carlos Baiz Named a 2020 Cottrell Scholar

Carlos Baiz, assistant professor of chemistry at The University of Texas at Austin, has been named a 2020 Cottrell Scholar by the Research Corporation for Science Advancement (RCSA).

Auto Emissions Generate More Dangerous Ultrafine Particles Than Once Thought

Auto Emissions Generate More Dangerous Ultrafine Particles Than Once Thought

University of Texas at Austin undergraduate Annie Zhang was part of a research team that found auto emissions are responsible for more dangerous ultrafine particles than previously thought. Photo credit: Vivian Abagiu.

An international team of researchers that includes undergraduate chemistry student Annie Zhang from The University of Texas at Austin has found that aromatic compounds from auto emissions play a key role in the creation of tiny airborne particles that pose a significant health problem in many urban areas of the world.

UT Prof Wins Engineering’s Highest Honor for Advancing Micro- and Nanofabrication

UT Prof Wins Engineering’s Highest Honor for Advancing Micro- and Nanofabrication

The National Academy of Engineering (NAE) will bestow University of Texas at Austin professor C. Grant Willson with the Charles Stark Draper Prize for Engineering — widely regarded as the highest honor in the profession — for his pioneering work enabling the extreme miniaturization of microelectronic devices.

Researchers Discover New Way to Split and Sum Photons with Silicon

Researchers Discover New Way to Split and Sum Photons with Silicon

A team of researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of California, Riverside have found a way to produce a long-hypothesized phenomenon—the transfer of energy between silicon and organic, carbon-based molecules—in a breakthrough that has implications for information storage in quantum computing, solar energy conversion and medical imaging. The research is described in a paper out today in the journal Nature Chemistry.

Three Natural Sciences Professors Win UT Invent & Innovate Awards

Three Natural Sciences Professors Win UT Invent & Innovate Awards

Eric Anslyn, Edward Marcotte and George Georgiou were honored at an event this month honoring the top innovations and inventions of the year to come out of The University of Texas at Austin.

UT Austin Chemical Sensor Startup Secures Major Investment

UT Austin Chemical Sensor Startup Secures Major Investment

Lantha’s sensors can quickly and cheaply identify a wide range of chemicals in an uncharacterized sample. Each chemical produces a unique eight-factor signature of color and brightness that can be used to identify it and quantify concentrations. Credit: Sam Dunning and David Steadman.

A tech startup that spun out of The University of Texas at Austin, Lantha Inc., has successfully completed its first round of venture capital investments, securing $2.6 million from the GOOSE Society of Texas and other investors. The company is commercializing a novel chemical sensor invented at UT Austin that holds promise to dramatically lower costs and return faster results compared with other analytical tools. The innovation could have applications as diverse as the detection of chemical isotopes, quality control testing of feedstocks in manufacturing computer chips and pharmaceuticals, and detecting contamination in drinking water.

Tags:
Graduate Students Receive Department of Energy Fellowships

Graduate Students Receive Department of Energy Fellowships

Graduate students Albina Khasanova and Emily Raulerson received research fellowships from the Department of Energy.

Two graduate students from the University of Texas at Austin, Albina Khasanova and Emily Raulerson, received fellowships from the Department of Energy to carry out research in one of 12 DOE national laboratories.

New Test for Thyroid Cancer Could Prevent Unnecessary Surgery

New Test for Thyroid Cancer Could Prevent Unnecessary Surgery

A new preoperative test for thyroid cancer that’s faster and more accurate than the diagnostic test that doctors use today could prevent thousands of unnecessary thyroid removals each year. Credit: iStock.

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Baylor College of Medicine have developed a new preoperative test for thyroid cancer that is faster and about two-thirds more accurate than the diagnostic tests doctors use today. Although more validation will be necessary before it can be used clinically, the new metabolic thyroid test shows promise for preventing thousands of unnecessary thyroid removals each year, such as the partial removal UT Austin grad student Amanda Helms had due to an inconclusive test.

Chemist Awarded Prestigious NIH Grant to Study Metals in Proteins and Enzymes

Chemist Awarded Prestigious NIH Grant to Study Metals in Proteins and Enzymes

Emily Que, an assistant professor of chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin, has been awarded a five-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop tools to study metal- containing enzymes and proteins. The research has potential implications across a broad spectrum of human health areas including cancer, fertility, diabetes, and infectious disease research.

Tags:
Michael Krische Receives American Chemical Society Award

Michael Krische Receives American Chemical Society Award

Michael Krische, professor of chemistry and the Robert A. Welch Chair in Science at The University of Texas at Austin, is the 2020 recipient of the American Chemical Society's Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry.

Texas Organization Donates Millions to UT Austin Cancer-Fighting Research

Texas Organization Donates Millions to UT Austin Cancer-Fighting Research

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin will head into September, childhood cancer awareness month, with nearly $5 million in new cancer prevention funding from the State of Texas.