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From the College of Natural Sciences
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For Students Returning for the Spring Semester amid COVID-19

Dean Goldbart recorded this video message for Texas Science students after the two-week Spring Break brought about by COVID-19. The message encourages students as they embark on online learning, research and safely distant social experiences this spring.

Support Texas Science Students Via the Student Emergency Fund

Support Texas Science Students Via the Student Emergency Fund

​In a message to Longhorn Nation, President Fenves announced a new effort to support University of Texas at Austin students in the aftermath of the outbreak of COVID-19. Here is his message and how you can help.

Reflections at the End of an Unusual Work Week

Dean Goldbart sent a message to all faculty and staff after the first full work week after the University's emergency closure due to COVID-19 on Friday, March 13.

New Method Could Transform Vaccine Distribution to Remote, Developing Areas

New Method Could Transform Vaccine Distribution to Remote, Developing Areas

Access to vaccines around the world could get easier thanks to scientists at The University of Texas at Austin who have developed an inexpensive and innovative vaccine delivery method that preserves live viruses, bacteria, antibodies and enzymes without refrigeration. Maria A. Croyle, a professor in the College of Pharmacy with a courtesy appoin...
The Next 50 Years: Thinking Outside the Brain

The Next 50 Years: Thinking Outside the Brain

This semester, the College of Natural Sciences is checking in with faculty experts about developments related to their fields of study that may well affect how we live, work and interact with one another and the world around us over the next 50 years. For this installment, we hear from Professor Adron Harris, M. June and J. Virgil Waggoner Chair in Molecular Biology, a professor of neuroscience, pharmacology and psychiatry, and the associate director of the Waggoner Center for Alcohol and Addiction Research.

A Transition in the CNS Office of the Associate Dean for Research and Facilities

Dean Paul Goldbart informed members of the college community about an upcoming leadership change in the Office of Research and Facilities.

Alum Prem Mahendroo and the Research Bug

Alum Prem Mahendroo and the Research Bug

Prem Mahendroo at home in Arlington. Photos on this page by: Vivian Abagiu, Sloan Breeden, Tara Trujillo-Smith

As a young boy, Prem Mahendroo loved to fly kites near the Ganges River in his hometown of Haridwar, India. He has a vivid memory of climbing up the side of his house to free one that had been trapped. A fall could have been deadly, but he was determined to grasp what was just beyond reach.

That moment provides a glimpse of Mahendroo's life and work. Throughout his career as a physicist, he reached beyond. He would become a pioneer in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research and is admired by Nobel Prize winners in the field.

Auto Emissions Generate More Dangerous Ultrafine Particles Than Once Thought

Auto Emissions Generate More Dangerous Ultrafine Particles Than Once Thought

University of Texas at Austin undergraduate Annie Zhang was part of a research team that found auto emissions are responsible for more dangerous ultrafine particles than previously thought. Photo credit: Vivian Abagiu.

An international team of researchers that includes undergraduate chemistry student Annie Zhang from The University of Texas at Austin has found that aromatic compounds from auto emissions play a key role in the creation of tiny airborne particles that pose a significant health problem in many urban areas of the world.

The Next 50 Years: Building Ties and Tracking Early Experiences for a Longer Lifespan

The Next 50 Years: Building Ties and Tracking Early Experiences for a Longer Lifespan

​This semester, the College of Natural Sciences is checking in with faculty experts about developments, related to their fields of study, that may well affect how we live, work and interact with one another and the world around us over the next 50 years. For this installment, we hear from Professor Karen Fingerman, professor of human development and family sciences and co-director of the Texas Aging & Longevity Center, which this week celebrates one year in operation at UT Austin.

UT Prof Wins Engineering’s Highest Honor for Advancing Micro- and Nanofabrication

UT Prof Wins Engineering’s Highest Honor for Advancing Micro- and Nanofabrication

The National Academy of Engineering (NAE) will bestow University of Texas at Austin professor C. Grant Willson with the Charles Stark Draper Prize for Engineering — widely regarded as the highest honor in the profession — for his pioneering work enabling the extreme miniaturization of microelectronic devices.