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From the College of Natural Sciences

Marc Airhart is the Communications Coordinator for the College of Natural Sciences. A long time member of the National Association of Science Writers, he has written for national publications including Scientific American, Mercury, The Earth Scientist, Environmental Engineer & Scientist, and StarDate Magazine. He also spent 11 years as a writer and producer for the Earth & Sky radio series. Contact me

A Machine That Understands Language Like a Human (Audio)

A Machine That Understands Language Like a Human (Audio)

One thing that sets humans apart from even the smartest of artificially intelligent machines is the ability to understand, not just the definitions of words and phrases, but the deepest meanings embedded in human language.

The Tool Maker: The Double Life of Everett Stone

The Tool Maker: The Double Life of Everett Stone

A story about how a blacksmith (Everett Stone) learned to forge new tools in the fight against cancer. Photo by Marsha Miller.

For Everett Stone, being a cancer researcher is not so different from being a blacksmith. "I feel like an overarching theme in my career is that I've made many, many tools. Some of them are good enough to be medicines," he says.

Neuroscientists Win University Teaching Awards

Neuroscientists Win University Teaching Awards

Neuroscience professors Nace Golding (left) and Michael Mauk (right) both won university-wide teaching awards.

Within days of each other, two professors of neuroscience and one undergraduate teaching assistant have won University of Texas at Austin teaching awards.

Faculty Members Receive Prestigious NSF CAREER Awards

Faculty Members Receive Prestigious NSF CAREER Awards

Carlos Baiz, Philipp Krähenbühl, Qiang Liu and Christopher Rossbach were selected to receive NSF CAREER awards.

Four faculty members from the College of Natural Sciences have received distinguished Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Awards totaling $2.1 million over 5 years from the National Science Foundation.

Imaging, Reimagined

Imaging, Reimagined

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) helps doctors diagnose a host of problems from tumors to spinal cord injuries to strokes. But MRI scans require patients to spend as long as a half-hour or hour uncomfortably confined in a tube, sometimes at a cost of thousands of dollars.

Scientists Discover New Details about Metabolism in Ancestors of All Complex Life

Scientists Discover New Details about Metabolism in Ancestors of All Complex Life

A team of researchers from Uppsala University in Sweden, The University of Texas at Austin and elsewhere, have found new evidence that strengthens the hypothesis that the first complex life forms, called eukaryotes, arose from the merger of two simpler life forms. The same team previously identified living relatives of ancestors of eukaryotes, while this latest study shows how those ancestors might have shared the work of metabolism with bacteria they acted as hosts for.

Mathematics’ Highest Prize Awarded to UT Austin’s Karen Uhlenbeck

Mathematics’ Highest Prize Awarded to UT Austin’s Karen Uhlenbeck

Dr. Uhlenbeck this week at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, where she is a current Visitor in the School of Mathematics. Photo credit: Andrea Kane, Institute for Advanced Study

A professor emerita of mathematics at The University of Texas at Austin has received mathematics' top international award for the year. The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters has named Karen Uhlenbeck its 2019 Abel Prize award winner.

A Love Letter from Texas Scientists to the Periodic Table (Audio)

A Love Letter from Texas Scientists to the Periodic Table (Audio)

We're celebrating the 150th anniversary of the periodic table. Join us as we tour the cosmos, from the microscopic to the telescopic, with four scientists studying the role of four elements—zinc, oxygen, palladium and gold—in life, the universe and everything.

In Singing Mice, Scientists Find Clue to Our Own Rapid Conversations

In Singing Mice, Scientists Find Clue to Our Own Rapid Conversations

Alston's singing mouse. Photo by Bret Pasch.

Studying the songs of mice from the cloud forests of Costa Rica, researchers from New York University School of Medicine and The University of Texas at Austin have identified a brain circuit that might enable the high-speed back and forth of human conversation. This insight, published online today in the journal Science, could help researchers better understand the causes of speech disorders and point the way to new treatments.

Texas Invasive Species Program Gets Boost from Lee and Ramona Bass Foundation

Texas Invasive Species Program Gets Boost from Lee and Ramona Bass Foundation

Destructive and costly fire ants, crazy ants, moth larvae and invasive grasses can wreak havoc on Texas ecosystems, but biologists at The University of Texas at Austin are bringing the fight to them. With the help of a $6 million continuing grant from the Lee and Ramona Bass Foundation, researchers in the Texas Invasive Species Program will seek n...