News

From the College of Natural Sciences
Font size: +

Three Faculty Members Named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Three Faculty Members Named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Faculty chosen for their scientifically distinguished efforts to advance science and its applications.

Three College of Natural Sciences faculty members have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

AAAS fellows are chosen annually by their peers to recognize their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.

This year’s fellows are:

Andrew Ellington, professor of chemistry and biochemistry. Ellington was recognized for his contributions to nucleic acid aptamer and ribozyme discovery, evolutionary biology and the development of numerous biological diagnostics technologies. Ellington coined the terms “aptamer” and “aptazyme” to reflect new classes of molecules that he helped invent, and he has helped to both define and break down the boundaries between living and nonliving systems.

Neal Evans II, professor of astronomy. Evans was recognized for his major contributions to our knowledge of star and planet formation and meritorious service to the field of astronomy. Evans led a team of 60 astronomers in a Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy Science Program focused on star formation, one of six major Spitzer surveys that have generated a huge amount of open-access data for astronomers and led to more than 50 scientific papers.

Robert Krug, professor and chairman of molecular genetics and microbiology. Krug was recognized for his seminal research in virology, especially the understanding of host-virus interactions in influenza, and contributions to public health and education. Krug has discovered various molecular targets that could lead to antiviral treatments for influenza.

The new fellows will be honored during the AAAS Fellows Forum at the 2013 AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston on Feb. 16. They join 35 previously honored AAAS fellows in the college.

Texas Astronomers Measure Most Massive, Most Unusu...
Camp ANWR: Teaching Marine Science at the Top of t...

Comments

 
No comments made yet. Be the first to submit a comment
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Monday, 20 November 2017

Captcha Image