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Domjan, Michael

Michael P Domjan

Professor
Department of Psychology



domjan@austin.utexas.edu

Phone: 512-471-7702

Office Location
SEA 4.232

Postal Address
108 E DEAN KEETON ST
AUSTIN, TX 78712

MICHAEL DOMJAN is Professor of Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin, where he has taught learning to undergraduate and graduate students since 1973. He served as Department Chair from 1999–2005 and was the Founding Director of the Imaging Research Center from 2005–2008. Professor Domjan is noted for his functional approach to classical conditioning, which he has pursued in studies of sexual conditioning and taste aversion learning. Domjan is the 2014 recipient of the D. O. Hebb Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award from Division 6 of the American Psychological Association. His research, supported by grants from NSF and NIH for 30 years, was previously selected for a MERIT Award by the National Institutes of Mental Health and a Golden Fleece Award by United States Senator William Proxmire. Domjan served as Editor of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes for six years and continues to serve on the Board of Consulting Editors for various journals in the United States, Colombia, and Mexico. His textbook, Principles of Learning and Behavior (Cengage) is available in both English and Spanish and has been used on five continents for more than a quarter century. Domjan is a past President of the Pavlovian Society and also served as President of the Division of Behavioral Neuroscience and Comparative Psychology of the American Psychological Association. His former Ph.D. students hold faculty positions at various major colleges and universities in the United States, Colombia, and Turkey. Domjan also enjoys playing the viola and teaches a freshman Signature Course on Music and Psychology. He recently initiated the Tertis/Pavlov Project which consists of a series of educational videos exploring connections between music and psychology.

Basic behavioral mechanisms of learning, Pavlovian conditioning, evolutionary constraints on learning, and learning and other psychological processes in music

Domjan, M. (2016). Biological constraints on learning. In H. L. Miller (Ed.), Encyclopedia of theory in psychology. Sage Publications.  DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4135/9781483346274.n37

Krause, M., & Domjan, M. (2017, in press). Ethological and Evolutionary Perspectives on Pavlovian Conditioning. In J. Call (Ed.), Handbook of Comparative Psychology. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.

Domjan, M., & Krause, M. (2017, in press). Generality of the laws of learning: From biological constraints to ecological perspectives. In J. Byrne (Ed.) Learning and Memory: A comprehensive reference. (Vol. 1, Learning and Behavior Theory, R. Menzel, Ed.) Oxford: Elsevier.

Domjan, M. (2017). The essentials of conditioning and learning. 4th edition. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. (in press)

Domjan, M. (2016). Elicited versus emitted behavior: Time to abandon the distinction. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 105(2), 231-245.

Domjan, M. (2015). The Garcia-Koelling selective association effect: A historical and personal perspective. International Journal of Comparative Psychology, volume 28. Permalink: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/5sx993rm

Domjan, M. (2015).  Principles of learning and behavior. 7th Edition. Stamford, CN: Cengage Learning.

Domjan, M. (2012). Erotic/sexual learning. In N. M. Seel (Ed.), Encyclopedia of the Sciences of Learning. (pp. 1171-1174). New York: Springer. 

Domjan, M., Mahometa, M. J., & Matthews, R. N. (2012). Learning in intimate connections: Conditioned fertility and its role in sexual competition. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, vol. 2, pages 1-10.  DOI: 10.3402/snp.v2i0.17333.  (Open source)

Cusato, B., & Domjan, M. (2012). Naturalistic  conditioned stimuli facilitate sexual conditioning because of their similarity with the unconditioned stimulus. International Journal of Comparative Psychology. 25, 166-179.