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Beer, Jennifer

Jennifer S Beer

Professor
Department of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry



beerutexas@gmail.com


Office Location
SEA 3.208

Postal Address
108 E DEAN KEETON ST
AUSTIN, TX 78712

Dr. Beer is an Associate Professor at the University of Texas at Austin. She is affiliated with the Psychology Department (Social & Personality Area, Cognitive Neuroscience Area), the Imaging Research Center, and the Institute for Neuroscience.

Research in our lab focuses on self-processes, emotion processes and social cognition. We're interested in how these processes contribute to appropriate social functioning. For example, how do self-perceptions and emotions influence decisions in social interactions? To address these questions, we use behavioral methods such as behavioral observation (e.g., FACS coding, reaction times, self and peer-report) in addition to neuroscience methods such as neuroimaging (fMRI) and studies of patient populations.

What do we know about positive appraisals?: Low cognitive cost, orbitofrontal-striatal connectivity, and only short term bolstering of resilience. Beer, J.S. & Flagan, T. (in press). Behavioral and Brain Sciences.

What do we know about emotional influences on social cognition? A social neuroscience perspective. Beer, J. S. (2016). Emotion Review, 8, 1-9.

Abstract


Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science. Open Science Collaboration. (2015)Science. 349(6251). DOI: 10.1126/science.aac4716

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Exaggerated positivity in self-evaluation: A social neuroscience approach to reconciling the role of self-esteem protection and cognitive bias. Beer, J.S. (2014). Social and Personality Compass. 8, 583-594.

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Three ways in which midline regions contribute to self-evaluation. Flagan, T. & Beer, J.S. (2013). Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.7, 1-12.

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Dissociable neural modulation underlying lasting first impressions, changing your mind for the better, and changing it for the worse. Bhanji, J. P. & Beer, J. S. (2013). Journal of Neuroscience. 32, 9337-9344.

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Protecting the self: The effect of social-evaluative threat on neural representations of self. Hughes, B. L., & Beer, J.S., (2013). Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. 25, 613-622.

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Social threat and cognitive load magnify self-enhancement and attenuate self-deprecation. Beer, J. S., Chester, D. S., & Hughes, B. L. (2013). Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. 49, 706-711.

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