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From the College of Natural Sciences
Extending a Welcome Mat for Scientific, Mathematical Talent

Extending a Welcome Mat for Scientific, Mathematical Talent

In recent weeks, a pair of researchers received two of the biggest prizes in science, the Breakthrough Prize and the Lasker Award. Both women seized the moment to shine a light on something too frequently cast into the shadows—namely that STEM fields need more women and people from underrepresented communities involved and made welcome in their pursuits.

College-Wide Focus on Increasing Student Success Brings Significant Pay-Off

College-Wide Focus on Increasing Student Success Brings Significant Pay-Off


Update: ​Since this article was written, more data on continuing improvements in graduation rates has become available. In 2017-2018, four-year graduation rates in the College of Natural Sciences were 73.5 percent.

Tackling Science and Engineering’s Diversity Problem (Audio)

Tackling Science and Engineering’s Diversity Problem (Audio)

The STEM fields – science, technology, engineering and math – have real work to do in terms of diversity. Right now, women make up only about 30 percent of the STEM workforce – and people identifying as black or Hispanic make up just 11 percent.

Women in Natural Sciences Inspire a New Generation

Women in Natural Sciences Inspire a New Generation

Women in Natural Sciences students demonstrate some explosive chemistry at an adult event at Thinkery, Austin’s children’s museum.

Amid the national debate about the lack of women in science, experts often cite the need for more female role models to inspire a new generation. Today, there are signs that the public face of science is changing. In Austin, among the vanguard are young women scientists.

How a Tech Sector Friendlier to Women Can Start in the Classroom

How a Tech Sector Friendlier to Women Can Start in the Classroom

Photo by Marsha Miller.

With recent talk of a "bro culture" in Silicon Valley and accusations of sex discrimination in the technology sector, some in the College of Natural Sciences' Department of Computer Science are taking it upon themselves to build a culture of inclusion.

Meet Six Incredible Women from UT Austin Science History

Meet Six Incredible Women from UT Austin Science History

Today is the 103rd anniversary of the birth of Lorene Rogers, a notable alumna and scientist who also was the first woman ever to lead a major U.S. university (which just happened to be The University of Texas at Austin)! In honor of her and our year-long campaign celebrating women in science, we are telling the stories of six incredible women scientists and mathematicians with a history right here on the Forty Acres. 

International Women's Day Kick-Off for Crowdfunding Campaign

International Women's Day Kick-Off for Crowdfunding Campaign

Women in Natural Sciences, a small learning community within the College, has been raising retention rates in science and the academic success rates of its students for years. Now it's looking to the community to help raise support and capacity in the program.

Overcoming Women’s Hurdles in Science Will Stimulate the Economy

Overcoming Women’s Hurdles in Science Will Stimulate the Economy

In a recent op-ed appearing in the Dallas Morning News, Psychology Today and the Rio Grande Guardian, Shelley Payne provides evidence that both society and science will benefit by removing barriers that discourage women and people of color from pursuing a path in science, technology, engineering and math. Payne, a professor in molecular biosciences, is also the College of Natural Sciences' Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin.

A Year for Recognizing Achievements by Women in Science

A Year for Recognizing Achievements by Women in Science

We in the sciences love our milestones. We see occasions for celebration in the 50th anniversary of Moore's Law, the 100th anniversary of the Theory of General Relativity, and the centennial commemoration of the first Longhorn getting a science Ph.D. at UT Austin. In that spirit, we find a whole host of reasons in 2017 to recognize and honor a growing segment of the world's scientific leaders—women.

Hands-On Science Courses Boost Graduation Rates and STEM Retention

Hands-On Science Courses Boost Graduation Rates and STEM Retention

In a positive sign for efforts to boost U.S. competitiveness in science and technology, a new study finds that courses that engage college students in conducting scientific research early on can dramatically increase students' odds of completing a science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) degree.