News

From the College of Natural Sciences
Mathematics Researcher Earns Prestigious Fellowship

Mathematics Researcher Earns Prestigious Fellowship

Bubacarr Bah, a postdoctoral researcher in mathematics at the University of Texas at Austin, has been awarded the prestigious German Chair in Mathematics, valued at $700,000. The Humboldt Foundation gives the award to researchers wishing to work in the renowned African Institute for Mathematical Science in South Africa (AIMS - South Africa).

Dinosaur Blood Vessels Found Unfossilized and Analyzed for the First Time

Dinosaur Blood Vessels Found Unfossilized and Analyzed for the First Time

​The extant blood vessels of a duck billed dinosaur have been discovered and analyzed after 80 million years, in an effort led by Tim Cleland, a postdoctoral Collaborative Opportunities for Research Educators (CORE) fellow at the University of Texas at Austin in the Department of Chemistry. 

Alcohol Abuse Linked to Newly Identified Gene Network

Alcohol Abuse Linked to Newly Identified Gene Network

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have identified a network of genes that appear to work together in determining alcohol dependence. The findings, which could lead to future treatments and therapies for alcoholics and possibly help doctors screen for alcoholism, are being published this week in the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

Florida Lizards Evolve Rapidly, Within 15 Years and 20 Generations

Florida Lizards Evolve Rapidly, Within 15 Years and 20 Generations

Acarolinensis LeftFoot Stuart G063 sm-300x275Scientists working on islands in Florida have documented the rapid evolution of a native lizard species — in as little as 15 years — as a result of pressure from an invading lizard species, introduced from Cuba.

As Ebola Kills Some, It May Be Quietly Immunizing Others

As Ebola Kills Some, It May Be Quietly Immunizing Others

Ebola virus

As Ebola continues to spread in West Africa, it may be silently immunizing large numbers of people who never fall ill or infect others, yet become protected from future infection. If such immunity is confirmed, it would have significant ramifications on projections of how widespread the disease will be and could help determine strategies that health workers use to contain the disease, according to a letter published Tuesday in the Lancet medical journal.

Singing Mice Protect Their Turf with High-Pitched Tunes

Singing Mice Protect Their Turf with High-Pitched Tunes

Two species of tawny brown singing mice that live deep in the mountain cloud forests of Costa Rica and Panama set their boundaries by emitting high-pitched trills, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered.