News

From the College of Natural Sciences
New Technique Enables Safer Gene-Editing Therapy Using CRISPR

New Technique Enables Safer Gene-Editing Therapy Using CRISPR

A CRISPR protein targets specific sections of DNA and cuts them. Scientists have turned this natural defense mechanism in bacteria into a tool for gene editing. Illustration: Jenna Luecke and David Steadman/Univ. of Texas at Austin.

Scientists from The University of Texas at Austin took an important step toward safer gene-editing cures for life-threatening disorders, from cancer to HIV to Huntington's disease, by developing a technique that can spot editing mistakes a popular tool known as CRISPR makes to an individual's genome. The research appears today in the journal Cell.

Overuse of Antibiotics Brings Risks for Bees — and for Us

Overuse of Antibiotics Brings Risks for Bees — and for Us

Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin have found that honeybees treated with a common antibiotic were half as likely to survive the week after treatment compared with a group of untreated bees, a finding that may have health implications for bees and people alike.

Mathematics Researcher Earns Prestigious Fellowship

Mathematics Researcher Earns Prestigious Fellowship

Bubacarr Bah, a postdoctoral researcher in mathematics at the University of Texas at Austin, has been awarded the prestigious German Chair in Mathematics, valued at $700,000. The Humboldt Foundation gives the award to researchers wishing to work in the renowned African Institute for Mathematical Science in South Africa (AIMS - South Africa).

Dinosaur Blood Vessels Found Unfossilized and Analyzed for the First Time

Dinosaur Blood Vessels Found Unfossilized and Analyzed for the First Time

​The extant blood vessels of a duck billed dinosaur have been discovered and analyzed after 80 million years, in an effort led by Tim Cleland, a postdoctoral Collaborative Opportunities for Research Educators (CORE) fellow at the University of Texas at Austin in the Department of Chemistry. 

Researchers Discover First Sensor of Earth’s Magnetic Field in an Animal

Researchers Discover First Sensor of Earth’s Magnetic Field in an Animal

A team of scientists and engineers at The University of Texas at Austin has identified the first sensor of the Earth’s magnetic field in an animal, finding in the brain of a tiny worm a big clue to a long-held mystery about how animals’ internal compasses work.

UT Austin Researchers Evaluate Methodology of Ebola Vaccine Trials

UT Austin Researchers Evaluate Methodology of Ebola Vaccine Trials

Medical aid workers in full protective gearThe waning number of Ebola cases is good news for West Africa, but for those developing a vaccine for the disease, it means time is running short.

HIV Not As Infectious Soon After Transmission As Thought

HIV Not As Infectious Soon After Transmission As Thought

People who recently have been infected with HIV may not be as highly infectious as previously believed, a finding that could improve global efforts to prevent HIV transmission and save lives.