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From the College of Natural Sciences
How a Tech Sector Friendlier to Women Can Start in the Classroom

How a Tech Sector Friendlier to Women Can Start in the Classroom

Photo by Marsha Miller.

With recent talk of a "bro culture" in Silicon Valley and accusations of sex discrimination in the technology sector, some in the College of Natural Sciences' Department of Computer Science are taking it upon themselves to build a culture of inclusion.

Quantum Computer Scientist Named Simons Foundation Investigator

Quantum Computer Scientist Named Simons Foundation Investigator

Scott Aaronson

Computer scientist Scott Aaronson of The University of Texas at Austin has been selected as a 2017 Simons Investigator in Theoretical Computer Science by the Simons Foundation for his work in quantum computation.

Computer Science Students Win Best Paper Award

Computer Science Students Win Best Paper Award

By printing this bunny in two pieces, the need for printing and later removing support structures has been eliminated.

Two undergraduate students at the University of Texas at Austin and their faculty co-authors have won a best paper award from the Association for Computing Machinery. They presented their paper, which focuses on making 3D printing more efficient, at the Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference on July 18. Their paper was one of two nominated in the Real World Applications category.

When Will We Have Quantum Computers? (Audio)

When Will We Have Quantum Computers? (Audio)

Quantum computers might sound like science fiction. A fully functioning quantum computer could complete calculations in a matter of seconds that would take a conventional computer millions of years to process.

Computer Scientist Named to UT Austin's Academy of Distinguished Teachers

Computer Scientist Named to UT Austin's Academy of Distinguished Teachers

Kristen Grauman, associate professor in the Department of Computer Science, has been inducted into The University of Texas at Austin's respected Academy of Distinguished Teachers for 2017.

Porter and UT Recognized for Key Role in Local Tech Economy

Porter and UT Recognized for Key Role in Local Tech Economy

​At its annual meeting today, the Austin Chamber of Commerce recognized the chair of the Department of Computer Science for his outstanding contributions toward improving the local technology sector.

Experts Forecast the Changes Artificial Intelligence Could Bring by 2030

Experts Forecast the Changes Artificial Intelligence Could Bring by 2030

A panel of academic and industrial thinkers has looked ahead to 2030 to forecast how advances in artificial intelligence (AI) might affect life in a typical North American city — in areas diverse as transportation, healthcare and education — and spur discussion of how to ensure the safe, fair and beneficial development of these rapidly emerging technologies.

A new study, titled “Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030,” looks at the likely effects of AI technologies on urban life. Credit: iStock/Askold Romanov, Mlenny & Tricia Seibold
Q&A with Peter Stone: Where is Artificial Intelligence Headed?

Q&A with Peter Stone: Where is Artificial Intelligence Headed?

Peter Stone, a professor of computer science at The University of Texas at Austin, led a groundbreaking study on artificial intelligence (AI) being released today. The study, produced by a panel of 17 experts from around the world, looks at how specialized applications of AI might affect life in a typical North American city by the year 2030.

UT Austin Villa Wins at 2016 World RoboCup

UT Austin Villa Wins at 2016 World RoboCup

Five of the SPL team members at the 2016 RoboCup US Open, which the team won. From left to right, they are Katie Genter, Sanmit Narvekar, Josiah Hanna, Josh Kelle and Jake Menashe.

The UT Austin Villa robot soccer team, led by University of Texas at Austin computer science professor Peter Stone, returned from the 2016 RoboCup competition in Leipzig, Germany as the world champions in the 3D Simulation league and with an impressive second-place win in the Standard Platform League (SPL).

UT Computer Scientist Named Simons Foundation Investigator

UT Computer Scientist Named Simons Foundation Investigator

Computer scientist David Zuckerman of The University of Texas at Austin has been selected as a 2016 Simons Investigator in Theoretical Computer Science by the Simons Foundation for his work in pseudorandomness and randomness extraction.

Why is CGI in the Movies Still So Hard? (Audio)

Why is CGI in the Movies Still So Hard? (Audio)

As the summer movie season kicks into high gear, we talk with a scientist about some of the challenges in simulating the way everyday objects behave on the big screen through computer generated imagery (CGI). Etienne Vouga's computer simulations have helped bring to life a wizard's hair in The Hobbit and clothing in Tangled.

New Method of Producing Random Numbers Could Improve Cybersecurity

New Method of Producing Random Numbers Could Improve Cybersecurity

With an advance that one cryptography expert called a "masterpiece," University of Texas at Austin computer scientists have developed a new method for producing truly random numbers, a breakthrough that could be used to encrypt data, make electronic voting more secure, conduct statistically significant polls and more accurately simulate complex systems such as Earth's climate.

Computer Scientist Earns Prestigious ACM Award for Encryption Achievement

Computer Scientist Earns Prestigious ACM Award for Encryption Achievement

Brent Waters of The University of Texas at Austin has been selected to receive the Grace Murray Hopper Award from the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). This award recognizes the outstanding young computer professional of the year for a recent major technical or service contribution that was made at 35 years of age or less.

A.I. Expert Weighs in on Historic Computer vs. Human Contest

A.I. Expert Weighs in on Historic Computer vs. Human Contest

First the robots successfully challenged the chess masters, then the Jeopardy champions. Now comes a match-up for a new generation.

Computer Science Undergrad Gives Back in Big Way

Computer Science Undergrad Gives Back in Big Way

Nicholas Cobb, a second-year computer science student, has won national recognition repeatedly for his work with a charitable organization he started at the age of 12. Most recently, he traveled to New York for recognition at the 2015 Nickelodeon HALO Awards.