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From the College of Natural Sciences
Voting App “BeVote” Programmed by UT Students

Voting App “BeVote” Programmed by UT Students

Students at The University of Texas at Austin have a new tool to help them become better informed as voters. BeVote is a free cellphone app designed exclusively for UT students that provides accurate, nonpartisan information and was programmed by UT students.

Computer Science Online Master’s Degree Planned for Fall Launch from UT Austin

Computer Science Online Master’s Degree Planned for Fall Launch from UT Austin

The Department of Computer Science plans to launch an online master's degree program in fall 2019.

The University of Texas at Austin is making plans to bring its top-ranked computer science graduate program to students and professionals beyond campus through a new online master's degree program. Pending final approval by UT System and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, the university will partner with online learning provider edX to make UT's Top 10 computer science master's degree available to students around the world, affordably and on their own schedule.

Computer Scientists Receive $1.7 Million Grant to Make Chip Design Easier

Computer Scientists Receive $1.7 Million Grant to Make Chip Design Easier

Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin, Yale University and Texas State University have been awarded $5 million by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) as part of a program designed to spark the next wave of semiconductor innovation and circuit design in the U.S.

Six Predictions about the Future of Gaming from a Computer Scientist

Six Predictions about the Future of Gaming from a Computer Scientist

In honor of National Video Game Day (Sept. 12), we sat down with Dr. Paul Toprac, who leads the Games and Mobile Media Application (GAMMA) program at the University of Texas at Austin, to discuss the positives, negatives, misconceptions and future of gaming technology.

DNA Barcodes That Reliably Work: A Game-Changer for Biomedical Research

DNA Barcodes That Reliably Work: A Game-Changer for Biomedical Research

This illustration shows the most common structure of DNA found in a cell, called B-DNA. Credit: Richard Wheeler (Zephyris). Used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license.

In the same way that barcodes on your groceries help stores know what's in your cart, DNA barcodes help biologists attach genetic labels to biological molecules to do their own tracking during research, including of how a cancerous tumor evolves, how organs develop or which drug candidates actually work. Unfortunately with current methods, many DNA barcodes have a reliability problem much worse than your corner grocer's. They contain errors about 10 percent of the time, making interpreting data tricky and limiting the kinds of experiments that can be reliably done.

Meet Jacob Van Geffen, Class of 2018

Meet Jacob Van Geffen, Class of 2018

Jacob Van Geffen

Jacob Van Geffen started coding early. He loved the feeling of creating something from scratch. Before he came to The University of Texas at Austin, he knew that he wanted others to be able to experience that feeling as well. He was passionate about making programming easier and more accessible for all people.

Fifty Years after Sci-Fi’s “2001,” Rethinking Our Relationship with AI

Fifty Years after Sci-Fi’s “2001,” Rethinking Our Relationship with AI

Tuesday marks the 50th anniversary of "2001: A Space Odyssey." The groundbreaking science-fiction film earned an Academy Award for Best Visual Effects and appears on several of the American Film Institute's Top 100 lists. But what many remember best about the movie is HAL 9000, the murderous artificial intelligence aboard the spaceship that has been ranked cinema's 13th best villain.

Students Blend Science, Art and Communication to Design Games and Apps

Students Blend Science, Art and Communication to Design Games and Apps

Students showcase their games during Digital Demo Day. Photo by Jennifer Reel.

​The UT Game and Mobile Media Applications (GAMMA) program was established six years ago upon a simple principle: humans like to play.

Ashlie Martinez Earns Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Award

Ashlie Martinez Earns Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Award

Undergraduate student Ashlie Martinez has been selected as an awardee of the 2018 Computing Research Association's (CRA) Outstanding Undergraduate Researcher Award.

These Mathematical Techniques Could Help Design Shape-shifting Materials

These Mathematical Techniques Could Help Design Shape-shifting Materials

A snapdragon flower petal grown from a cylinder. In each state, the colors show the growth factors of the top (left) and bottom (right) layer, and the thin black lines indicate the direction of growth. The top layer is viewed from the front, and the bottom layer is viewed from the back, to highlight the complexity of the geometries. (Credit Harvard SEAS)

Nature has a way of making complex shapes from a set of simple growth rules. The curve of a petal, the swoop of a branch, even the contours of our face are shaped by these processes. What if we could unlock those rules and reverse engineer nature's ability to grow an infinitely diverse array of shapes?

How a Tech Sector Friendlier to Women Can Start in the Classroom

How a Tech Sector Friendlier to Women Can Start in the Classroom

Photo by Marsha Miller.

With recent talk of a "bro culture" in Silicon Valley and accusations of sex discrimination in the technology sector, some in the College of Natural Sciences' Department of Computer Science are taking it upon themselves to build a culture of inclusion.

Quantum Computer Scientist Named Simons Foundation Investigator

Quantum Computer Scientist Named Simons Foundation Investigator

Scott Aaronson

Computer scientist Scott Aaronson of The University of Texas at Austin has been selected as a 2017 Simons Investigator in Theoretical Computer Science by the Simons Foundation for his work in quantum computation.

Computer Science Students Win Best Paper Award

Computer Science Students Win Best Paper Award

By printing this bunny in two pieces, the need for printing and later removing support structures has been eliminated.

Two undergraduate students at the University of Texas at Austin and their faculty co-authors have won a best paper award from the Association for Computing Machinery. They presented their paper, which focuses on making 3D printing more efficient, at the Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference on July 18. Their paper was one of two nominated in the Real World Applications category.

When Will We Have Quantum Computers? (Audio)

When Will We Have Quantum Computers? (Audio)

Quantum computers might sound like science fiction. A fully functioning quantum computer could complete calculations in a matter of seconds that would take a conventional computer millions of years to process.

Computer Scientist Named to UT Austin's Academy of Distinguished Teachers

Computer Scientist Named to UT Austin's Academy of Distinguished Teachers

Kristen Grauman, associate professor in the Department of Computer Science, has been inducted into The University of Texas at Austin's respected Academy of Distinguished Teachers for 2017.