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This past Spring, we asked members of the College of Natural Sciences community to provide us with images that celebrated the extraordinary beauty of science and the scientific process.

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The blood drive was part a national effort to encourage Hispanic/Latino student leaders to take an active role both in raising health awareness within their communities.

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Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered a new chemical reaction that has the potential to lower the cost and streamline the manufacture of compounds ranging from agricultural chemicals to pharmaceutical drugs.

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Robert Dickey, a leader in areas of marine natural toxins, chemical contaminants and seafood safety, has been appointed the new director of The University of Texas at Austin’s Marine Science Institute (UTMSI) in Port Aransas, Texas.

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Tyler Ham, a 2006 graduate of the College of Natural Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin, has won a 2013 Webby Award for Best Science Website for his site, The First Men on the Moon: The Apollo 11 Lunar Landing.

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To combat and manage pesky invasive species such as fire ants, tawny crazy ants and Cactoblastis moths, the Texas Invasive Species Program has been established at The University of Texas at Austin with $2.7 million in support from the Lee and Ramona Bass Foundation.

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With the help of a robotic frog, biologists at The University of Texas at Austin and Salisbury University have discovered that two wrong mating calls can make a right for female túngara frogs.

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Dean Sacha Kopp answers some questions about the BSA, the new interdisciplinary degree in the College of Natural Sciences.

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By creating a small electrical field that removes salts from seawater, chemists at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Marburg in Germany have introduced a new method for the desalination of seawater that consumes less energy and is dramatically simpler than conventional techniques. The new method requires so little energy that it can run on a store-bought battery.

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Photographer Robert Shults looks for the sublime in his images of the Texas Petawatt Laser.