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Astronomer Taft Armandroff has been appointed the new director of the College of Natural Sciences McDonald Observatory in Fort Davis, Texas.

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University of Texas at Austin astronomer Steven Finkelstein has led a team that has discovered and measured the distance to the most distant galaxy ever found. The galaxy is seen as it was at a time just 700 million years after the Big Bang.

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The unusual black hole makes up 14 percent of its galaxy's mass, rather than the usual 0.1 percent, and lies 220 million light-years away in the constellation Perseus.
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Astronomer J. Craig Wheeler has a new idea on the identity of the "parents" of one of the most important types of supernovae in the universe.

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With its role in the construction of the Giant Magellan Telescope, the McDonald Observatory continues to push forward the frontiers of astronomical science.

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The discovery of the Tattooine-like system proves that whole planetary systems can form in a disk around a binary star.
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The white dwarf stars are so close together that they make a complete orbit in less than 13 minutes.

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Astronomer Don Winget is making white dwarf "star stuff" here on Earth.

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A brief history of the McDonald Observatory and the National Science Foundation.

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A Jupiter-size planet in a nearby solar system is dissolving because of interactions with its parent star.

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George Miller, astronomy senior and Dean’s Scholar in the College of Natural Sciences, has won the $20,000 grand prize in the University Co-operative Society’s George H. Mitchell Awards for Academic Excellence.
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University of Texas at Austin astronomers studied 166 of the most massive galaxies present only a few billion years after the Big Bang.

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Karl Gebhardt will receive the 2012 Edith and Peter O’Donnell Award in Science in recognition of his discoveries regarding the formation of black holes and galaxies.

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The planet is the first located in the "just-right" orbit that's not too hot, nor too cold for water to exist in liquid form, making life as we know it possible.